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Monthly Archives: October 2011

Happy Tuesday!  Today I’ve got something super exciting for you.  I’m hearing echos of Video Killed The Radio Star because today, I’ve got a video for ya!  If you’ve ever had back pain or currently have back pain and would like to avoid that in the future, this video is for you.  In it, I demonstrate 6 quick and simple stretches you can do to keep your back feeling flexible, comfortable, and pain free.

Check out the Spinal Six by clicking on the pic below!  I hope you enjoy it.  And feel free to send any questions, comments, or feedback my way!

Spinal Six Video

We don’t often think about standing.  We just do it.  But there are an awful lot of muscles, bones, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and fascia that all have to get on board before this simple thing can happen.  And once we’re upright, lots of things need to work to keep us there.  Let’s do a little exercise.  Go ahead, stand up with your feet about hip width apart.  Give it a few seconds.  Now, check in with your feet.  What do you notice?  Is there more weight on the outsides of your feet?  The insides?  Are you resting more on your heels or your toes?  Go ahead and gently rock forward and back and see if you can find the middle.  Is it comfortable to be there?  Do you stand more on your left or your right?  Go ahead and stand on one foot.  Now stand on the other.  Which one is easier?  Does it feel stronger?  More stable?  More balanced?  So many questions; so many things to consider; and we rarely think about any of them!  (You can sit down now, but I’m just going to make you stand back up in a minute.)

Ideally, when we stand, our weight should be balanced: front to back, side to side, inside to outside.  When we stand, everything that happens in our feet is reflected in our pelvis.  So if you’re just on the outsides of your feet, the central corridor of your pelvic floor (where all that important stuff like excretion happens) isn’t turning on.  And speaking of turning on, if all your weight is in your heels when you stand up, the front half of your pelvic floor isn’t being stimulated (and who doesn’t want the front half of their pelvic floor stimulated?).  If you’re noticing a drastic difference in any of these areas, it might be something to talk about with your favorite Rolfer (also known as Theresa).

Also, we’re not really supposed to ‘stand still.’  As you stand there should be a subtle weight transfer through your feet and subsequently through your pelvic floor.  Weight on the outside of the left heel moves to the left big toe.  From there, weight moves to the outside of the right heel and then to the right big toe, and back to the left heel.  Go ahead and stand up again (told you) and give it a try.  Exaggerate it until you can really feel what’s happening in your pelvis as you shift your weight on your feet.  There’s a figure-eight quality to it, yes?

Keep that motion going and shift your attention from your feet to your pelvis.  As your weight moves through your feet, muscles in your pelvic floor should tense and relax in a very smooth pattern, like a wave.  Are there spikes in your wave?  Is it harder to shift to the right or the left?  Maybe going forward on one side is more difficult than the other.  Do you notice any ‘dead spots’ where you just don’t feel anything in your pelvis?  Is your figure-eight smooth or choppy?  You can continue to make your weight shifting more and more dramatic to really feel into your pelvic floor.  Again, any big imbalances may be something to discuss with your favorite Rolfer.

And, since everything’s connected, what happens in your pelvic floor is reflected in your shoulders and your head.  So if you’re noticing a not-so-smooth figure-eight in your feet and your pelvis, it may be causing neck and shoulder pain or headaches and TMJ.  What?!  It’s crazy, I know.  Thinking about neck pain coming from your feet is hard to get your head around, but it happens all the time.  Just something to think about while you’re standing there rocking from side to side.  You can sit down now.

Okay, I know you know what a session is like You’ve had one, or several.  But do you ever have trouble explaining what it’s like to get Rolfed?  How you feel better, but it’s tough to put your finger on why?  Sure, the work hurts sometimes, but it also feels so good.  You know your friends are looking at you like you’re nuts.  What do you mean you feel taller?  What do you mean you feel more graceful?  You feel bigger?  Is that a good thing?  You feel more grounded?  It’s easier to breathe?  Your feet are contacting the ground more?  Huh?

This is your opportunity to share your experience with the skeptics.  Your mom doesn’t get it.  Your boyfriend just rolls his eyes.  Your coworker thinks you’ve been smoking something.  Let them all experience this stuff themselves and then they can try and explain it.  And you can sit there with that satisfied smirk on your face and say, “I told you so!”  And really, isn’t that what we all want out of life?

Demo Day returns this Saturday, October 15th.  30 minute sessions.  $10.  It doesn’t get better than that.  It’s the perfect way to try Rolfing, to try SourcePoint, and to try me to see if it’s something you like, without the commitment of a full session.  So spread the word and let the skeptics try it for themselves.  When they’re ready to give it a whirl, have them give me a call at 303-261-2568 or email me at t.zordan@gmail.com to set up their own personal demo!

1. Where are you located? Why? Because if you have to spend 90 minutes getting to your 90 minute appointments, you’re less likely to go. Just like a gym membership, Rolfing is more effective the more often you utilize it. While I know one person who took the bus 3 hours each way to his Rolfing appointments and went through the entire 10-series, most of us just aren’t that dedicated.

My A: My main office is at 662 Grant, on the second floor, in Denver, CO. I have a secondary office at 489 US. Hwy 287, inside the Baseline Chiropractic office in Lafayette, CO. I occasionally visit Chicago and when I do, I practice out of the Relaxation Station at 10655 S. Hale.

2. How much do you charge? Why? Because if you can’t afford it, there’s no reason asking any other questions. The average price range for Rolfing sessions varies widely by location, from $100 to $400. Again, Rolfing is more effective with more sessions, so plan for at least 3 visits. Rolfing is almost never covered by insurance.

My A: My fee is $120 per session. Children 10 and under are free. I don’t bill insurance companies, but am happy to provide treatment notes and receipts if this is an avenue you’d like to pursue.

3. What forms of payment do you take? Why? Because most Rolfers only accept cash and checks. You don’t want to show up with plastic and feel sheepish.

My A: I accept cash, checks, Visa, Mastercard, and Discover.

4. What is your style of working? Why? To know who’s a great or terrible fit for you and your body. You can learn a lot about a Rolfer by asking this question. -A “traditional” or “old school” Rolfer will tend to be very rough. Ida Rolf was not gentle, nor were the Rolfers who trained with her. This may be a good fit if you like super deep pressure, or are a masochist. -Someone who blends massage and Rolfing may used fascial release techniques in a traditional massage. This may be a good fit if you enjoy massage, but want a taste of Rolfing as well. -A movement practitioner is someone who’s completed an extra training to become movement certified. Movement work can be very powerful, but requires a lot of participation and involvement from the client. Not for those who are planning to sleep through their sessions. -Cranial-sacral work is very subtle, using very light pressure but with huge potential for change. Perfect for those afraid of “old school” Rolfing and awful for those who want an elbow in their quads.

My A: I use a broad spectrum of touch to get the maximum change with the minimum discomfort. While moments may be intense, most people find my work to be relaxing and enjoyable. I combine SourcePoint Therapy and Rolfing in a customized blend to fit your body and your needs. If you don’t want any energy work, or any hands-on work, I’m probably not the right fit for you as I have a hard time eliminating either completely. Oh, and you get to keep your clothes on during your session.

5. Do I need to do the 10-series? Why? Whether or not you want to receive the 10-series, you should know what your Rolfer has planned for you before you walk in the door.

My A: No; how many sessions you do is up to you. I do offer the traditional Rolfing 10­series if that’s the route you’d like to pursue, but it’s not expected. I’m happy to do targeted, customized sessions instead of following ‘the recipe.’

6. Where did you do your training? Why? Because Rolfers who trained in Brazil will have more of a movement emphasis in their work than people trained in the US or Germany. People who trained at the Guild for Structural Integration will be more traditional than people trained at the Rolf Institute®. Hellerworkers tend to integrate more talk therapy into their Structural Integration sessions. Neither Guild practitioners nor Hellerwork practitioners are considered “Rolfers” but are Structural Integrators.

My A: I trained at the Rolf Institute in Boulder, CO and have done all my continuing education there as well, except for one class in Santa Fe, NM.

7. How long have you been in practice? Why? This one’s a catch-22. Rolfers who have been in practice a long time obviously have more experience, which is a good thing. But there’s been a lot of research and new technique development in the 40 years that Rolfing’s been around. A Rolfer who hasn’t stayed on top of their continuing education may be working in an outdated way. Then again, a newer Rolfer may not have the experience needed to handle extremely complicated issues. And some people are just ‘naturals’ at Rolfing, whether they’re new or old. So it’s kind of a toss up, but it’s still good to know.

My A: I’m in my second year of practice.