Skip navigation

And as we talked about two weeks ago, shortening your back line is no good.

Remember that conversation about plantar fasciitis?  Remember how your fascia from the bottoms of your toes is connected all the way to the fascia covering the top of your head?  That line of fascia, all along your back, is called your back line.  Let’s take that information and think about flip-flops for a minute.  ‘Tis the season of intense heat, trips to the pool, and picnics in the park and I see flip-flops everywhere I go.

When you wear flip-flops, your toes have to hang on tight, lest one (or both) go flying.  And once in a while, for a few minutes here or there, that’s just fine.  If, on the other hand, you spend all summer with your toes hanging on for dear life, well, the fascia in your feet will tighten up.  As will the fascia in your calves, and your hamstrings, and your glutes, and your low back, and your mid-back, and your upper back, and your neck, and the back and top of your head.  Yuck.  That’s a lot of tight fascia. Like, your whole back line.

Which is not exactly what we’re looking for.  In fact, we’re looking for quite the opposite.  What we really want is a bunch of loosey-goosey fascia that’s all fluid and supple-like.  Slippery, slidey, juicy fascia.  Not dry, stiff, stressed-out fascia.

If you want to feel the difference flip-flops can make, try this exercise:  Go for a small walk, barefoot.  Walk around your house a few times, or a park, or the block.  Feel your whole foot contact the ground, from the initial contact of your heel, to the final push-off with your toes.  Let your toes spread out and gather all the information they can with each step.  Notice how your legs swing and how your hips feel.  Notice your arms swinging, and your back and shoulders moving as you walk.  Notice your breathing and how easy it is.  Get a sense of how it feels to walk barefoot.  Now, put your flip-flops on and go for the same short walk.  How do your toes feel?  Can you gather the same amount of information with your feet?  How do your hips and arms feel?  Any change in your back or posture?  Any change in your breath?  Which feel more ‘right,’ barefoot or flip-flops?  And if you can feel a difference after a 5 minute walk, how do you think your body feels by the end of the summer?

I know flip-flops are convenient.  And really, what else are you going to wear to the beach?  But if you can wear them as little as possible, your body will thank you for it down the road.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>