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Flip flop season is just getting started and I’m writing to ruin your fun.  I would say that I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if I’m honest, I kinda love it.  So let’s just get right to it, shall we?

I could talk for days about foot health and how important it is (as the foundation for the rest of your body all day, every day), but suffice it to say that it’s really, really important and whatever you do to your feet, the rest of your body has to deal with as well.  And so, when choosing your footwear this summer, can I please, please, please entice you away from the flip flops?

I know nobody will be surprised to hear me say that high heels aren’t good for you.  But so often I see people trade their heels (and yes, that includes the gentlemen; anything where your heel is higher than your toes is considered a high heel in my book) for flip flops and consider the problem solved.  Not so, my friend, not so.

Ideally, as you walk, your foot should go through a full, smooth roll, from the outside edge of your heel to the very tip of your big toe before leaving the ground to stride forward to the next step.  I tried to find a video of this, but this animation (which is a terrible example of how to walk, but is great if you just watch the feet) is the best I could find:

However, when you wear flip flops, you need to hang on to them with your toes or they’ll go flying.  Which means your toes are contracted when they should be at their longest, most extended.  And you do this with Every.  Single.  Step.  No bueno, team.  It shortens the fibers in the plantar surface of the foot…which can lead to plantar fasciitis.  It prevents you from having a full, long stride, so you end up taking more steps per mile, compounding the problem with each step.  It causes a mirrored shortness in the pelvic floor, straining the super fun zone that’s located there, as well as the bladder and the urethra (but those aren’t that important, right?).  With a shortened anterior pelvis, a hyper-lordotic lumbar curve is encouraged, which is just a fancy way of saying low back pain is probably on its way.  Oh, and knee problems!  I almost forgot about knee problems!  They come with flip flop use as well because all that tightening and shortening in the toes happens mostly through muscles in the lower leg, which creates imbalance in the knee joint, and let me tell you, the knee is a tricky joint to rebalance once it’s out of whack.

So.  Flip flops are bad.  Sorry, not sorry.

But, I really am trying to help you live your best life.  Not just now, but 10 years from now.  And 10 years after that.  And if you spend half the year wearing flip flops, every year, for 60 years, then come to me with plantar fasciitis, knee pain, back pain, and pelvic organ prolapse…well, don’t say I didn’t warn you, but I’ll happily take your money and we can do weekly Rolfing sessions for the next 5 years to get you back on track.

OR, try going barefoot!  Or, try one of the (what seems like hundreds of) ‘barefoot’ sandal options.  Or, just find a shoe that securely attaches to your foot so your toes don’t have to grip with every step.  Remember, your foot should be able to move like this:

And if it can’t while wearing and walking in your shoes, you’re basically putting your foot in a cast, then expecting it to do its job, which isn’t exactly fair.  I don’t put your hands in mittens then ask you to play the piano.  Set your feet up for success and ditch the flip flops.

Until next time, happy moving!
Theresa

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