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Please forgive me, SassyPants.  I know I wrote back in May about how I became a Rolfer.  In fact, I wrote so damn much about it, that it took up two posts.  And now, I’m telling the same old story, again, this time on video.  Really, if you already know, or don’t really care how I became a Rolfer, you don’t have to watch the video.  Not that I could make you if I tried.  But really, you don’t have to watch it.  I just get this question ALL the time.  And I love answering it.  So I answered it in a video to put up on my site.  And I loved the results.  So I’m sharing it with you.  And I say ‘and’ a lot.  Also, I say ‘so’ a lot.  So many things to beg forgiveness for.

If you have anything you’d rather hear about or questions you’d like answered, please let me know.  All the topics I considered writing about today bored me.  I’m asking you to be my inspiration.  Got anything good for me?

In the meantime, if you want, check out the video and let me know what you think.  Worth putting up on the site?

Oh!  And Demo Day is on Saturday.  Yes, this Saturday, the 15th.  Tell your friends.  Or your family members.  Or your neighbors.  Or nobody at all.  But if you want someone to come give me a try, this could be a good way for them to get a taste.  30 minute trial sessions for $10 each.  New clients only.  Have ‘em give me a call, or shoot me an email, if they want to schedule one.  Yay!  Demo Day!

Last night I sat down to write a newsletter about scarcity versus abundance.  Three paragraphs in, I decided to try a different approach.  Three paragraphs after that, I decided to try a different topic.  After a while, I just stopped.  As I climbed into bed, mad at myself for not having finished writing today’s newsletter, I realized the problem:  something else was on my mind.  Something else has been on my mind for about a week now, to be honest.

I got a call last week from one of my instructors at the Rolf Institute.  Apparently there’s been some discussion on the Rolf Forum about this video of mine, called “What Should I Expect From Rolfing?”  I made this video simply because I had about 20 people in a row come in for their first session and say to me at the end, “Well, that wasn’t what I was expecting.”  I thought that people should have a better understanding of what they were getting into before they came for a session.  Also, I figured it would help weed out the people who weren’t a good fit for my style of working.  I think it’s been doing its job because nowadays, pretty much every new client I get, I absolutely love, right off the bat.  There have been a lot of perfect fits, at least from my point of view, which is super awesome.  Less people wasting their money on the wrong Rolfer.  Less people spending an hour and a half thinking, “This isn’t what I was expecting!”  More people thinking, “Ah, this is just what I wanted!”  Seems like a good thing all around.

And yet, there’s this argument going on.  Let me explain.  The Rolf Forum was created back when the interweb was new, as a way to connect the (relatively small) Rolfer community.  To date there are just barely 1800 Certified Rolfers™ in the whole world.  Put a few hundred in Japan, a bunch in Europe and Canada, some in Brazil and Bali and Australia, and it can start to feel kinda lonely being a Rolfer.  I know it’s hard to believe, here in Colorado, where the Rolf Institute is located and there’s a Rolfer on every corner.  But there are zero Rolfers in Mississippi.  And two in Indiana (and they’re both named Dan; weird).  So the internet brought all these isolated Rolfers together to talk about questions they’d had or struggles with their practices or new research being done they wanted to share.  I’ll be honest:  I’ve never been on the Rolf Forum.  Don’t even know where to find it.  Not because I don’t want to connect with other Rolfers, but because my network of Rolfers is more personal and specific.  I feel very comfortable calling or emailing my instructors and mentors if I have a question or concern.  My classmates make the perfect network when I have a practice building question, or just want to geek out about Rolfing for a bit.  I call Sasha and Laura up, or better yet, we get together for beers when we’re in the same state.  I trade sessions with a few different Rolfers, and we ask all the questions we have, during those sessions.  I waste enough time on Facebook, thank you very much, and I don’t feel the need for another place to spend time online.  So it’s not out of disrespect for the Forum that I’ve never been on it; I just don’t seem to need it in my life.

But my instructor called me because my little video had started an argument on the Forum.  Apparently there are some Rolfers who don’t think what I’m doing is Rolfing.  Ida Rolf never talked about energy work, on video, at least.  There are plenty of quotes from her about energy fields and energy work in books, but she was trying to be seen as credible as she created this new form of bodywork in the 60′s and energy work didn’t go over so great with the medical community at the time.  Damn hippies.  Dr. Rolf put a great deal of energy into explaining things in structural terms and making sure her students were well educated in anatomy and physiology.  She wasn’t going to have people talking about pushing on the thingy until it felt squishy.  So, the argument goes, if Ida didn’t want to talk about energy work in her videos, why should I?  And there’s also the question of brand identity.  If someone goes to see a Rolfer in Minnesota, then moves to Denver and wants a Rolfer here, so comes to see me, they’re not going to get the same thing they got in Minnesota.

Well, duh, is what I say to that.  If you go see one doctor, then go see another, you’re not going to get the same thing.  That’s why it’s called a second opinion.  If they were all exactly the same, you wouldn’t bother to get a second opinion.  But just because different doctors do things differently, it doesn’t mean one’s a doctor and one’s not.  And when it comes to me talking about things that Ida wouldn’t…um, I’m not Ida.  Obviously.  I couldn’t be a little old lady from New York if I tried.  I don’t even like New York.  And I’m 5’8″, not 5’2″.  And Zordan’s a funny name, but not in the same way Rolf is.

So, it seems obvious to me, that this is a non-issue.  Yes, I’m a Rolfer.  Yes, I do energy work.  No, I don’t mind talking about it.  But now I want to know what you think.  Is what I do Rolfing?  You’ve had a session from me.  You’ve heard what other people say about Rolfing, and you’ve done your research on Rolfing in general.  Many of you have had Rolfing sessions from other Rolfers.  How do the sessions compare?  Would you say I don’t belong with other Rolfers?  When you get a chance,  post a comment on the blog here.  I’d really love to hear what you think.  And I’ll try to get to scarcity versus abundance soon.  I promise.

Oh, and Demo Day is Saturday.  If you haven’t had a session from me, and you want to try it for yourself, to see if I’m really a Rolfer or not, this is the perfect opportunity.  A 30 minute session for just $10.  There are only 4 spots left, so if you want one, get on it.

Okay, I know it’s not blog/newsletter day, but I didn’t want to wait ’til Tuesday, so here it is. Sorry about overloading your inbox this week.

I’ve been playing around with the idea of changing up my schedule for a couple of reasons. I always thought that I really needed two days off in a row. In every other job I’ve had, that first day off was a kind of stare-at-the-wall-and-do-nothing day and the second day was for all the things you couldn’t get done during the week, like laundry and grocery shopping and maybe a picnic if I was lucky. So, when I started my Rolfing practice I made sure to build in two days off in a row. Hooray for respecting my own needs! But the thing is, I really like Rolfing. Like, a lot. Like, more than pretty much anything else I do. Well, maybe I like eating more, but with eating I quickly reach the point where the pleasure is traded for pain, and well, then it’s not fun anymore. I certainly don’t need two days off in a row to eat. And since I like Rolfing so much, I miss it on those days I have off. Which means that I’ve been playing around with the idea of switching it all up. See, my goal was to see 6 clients a day, 4 days a week (and get an extra special 3rd day off!). But now, I’d like to try to see 4 clients a day, 6 days a week, just to see how I like it. As I said, I’ve been playing around with the idea. Will I love it? Will I hate it? No way to know, really, until I try it.

It’s tricky, though, to try such a thing, ’cause I share my office with the lovely and talented Tracy. And I can’t just switch my schedule up willy-nilly without making Tracy rightfully annoyed and frustrated. So, playing with the idea is all that I’ve done, until now. See, Tracy’s going out of town for the whole month of June to teach and work and see friends and ride a motorcycle and such. Therefore, the office is mine-all-mine for 30 days or so. Which means I can play with my schedule without risking pissing off one of my favorite bodywork trade buddies and long time office mate. Hooray!!

Here’s what that means for you: I’m open on Fridays during June. What!? I’m seeing clients from 10am to 4:30pm Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, in Denver. I’m seeing clients from 2:30pm to 9pm Mondays and Sundays, in Denver. And as usual, I’m seeing clients from 1:30 to 8pm on Tuesdays in Lafayette. The online scheduler that I use is all set up for this, so you don’t have to remember which times go with which days. Just schedule like you always do and you’ll notice different options available to you. Yay! Once again, this if for June only, to give it a whirl. Things will go back to normal for July, when Tracy’s back in town. Depending on how this little experiment goes, I’ll think about making these changes permanent, but I might really miss those two days off in a row. We’ll just have to play with it and see. So, wanna play?

I’m back in the States from the incredibly lovely France as of yesterday and feeling pretty good, thanks to Jake’s acupressure tips to avoid jet lag.  Jake, my whole family says thank you.  However, my brain’s still a tiny bit foggy.  So instead of writing a possibly rambling, possibly nonsensical article about carpal tunnel syndrome, today, I give you a video.  Last summer, my friend Alisha interviewed me and this is the result.  I know, it’s a bit long.  But if you watch to the end, you get to see me dancing around my house like a goof, so there’s something to look forward to.

I hope you enjoy it, but regardless of your reactions, I’d love to hear about them.  Please feel free to post your comments here on the blog!  Thanks and take care!

Practical notes for clients:

Chicagoans:
Last chance for Chicago Rolfing.  I’ve got two appointments available tomorrow (Tuesday) at 2:30 and 4:00.  On Wednesday, I have an 11:30 opening.  If you want one of them, let me know.

Coloradans:
I fly back to Denver on Wednesday night, but my first available appointment is Saturday at 11:30.  Then, on Sunday is another Demo Day!  So let your friends and family know they can try a 30-minute teaser session of Rolfing for just $10.  New clients only, please.

Just in case you didn’t know, the next Demo Day is tomorrow.  And if you don’t know what Demo Day is, let me break it down for you.  30 minute trial sessions.  $10.  At my Denver office at 662 Grant St., on the second floor.  New clients only.  Happens once a month (I’ve decided to keep them around, so no worries).  That’s all there is to it.  New clients can schedule with me via phone at 303-261-2568, or via email at t.zordan@gmail.com.

This particular Demo Day is almost all full.   The earliest time I have available is 4:30 in the afternoon, if that gives you any indication.  So, if you have any friends or family who want to get in, tell ‘em to get on it.  And, as usual, if you know someone who’s ready for a full length session, you can always grab them a referral card when you’re in the office so they can get half off their first visit.

Send those hurtin’ people my way so they can get to enjoying this beautiful weather!

You know what it’s like to receive a Rolfing/SourcePoint session from me, so I won’t go into it.  (And if you don’t know yet, I don’t know what you’re waiting for!  Get your butt into my office!)  Especially since everyone’s internal experience is so different and there’s not always a good way to describe it.  But what I will go into is what it feels like from my end.  What I experience while giving a session.  I’m in the process of trading a couple sessions with a fellow Rolfer and SoucePoint therapist and while I was working on him yesterday morning we got to talking about how each of us experiences healing from the practitioner’s point of view.  So let me lay it out for you, in case you were curious.   Disclaimer:  this is what it feels like for most of the sessions I do.  When working within the confines of the 10-series, it’s a little different, but not much.

I don’t heal anyone.   I can’t heal anyone.  Hate to break it to you.  The way I think about it is this:  your healing process is between you and your “gods.”  That may be God, or the trees, or your higher self, or your refrigerator, for all I care.  Regardless, it’s not me.  So, at the beginning of every session, I have a conversation that goes a little something like this:
Me:  “Hey, healing powers for this person!  Yeah, you!  So look, I’m here, in this room, with this person.  Is there anything I can help with?  You know how to heal, while I don’t.  And I have hands, while you don’t.  Let’s work together, yeah?  I’ll do my best to get my ego out of the way and listen really carefully to whatever directions you give if you’ll promise to do what you can on your end to heal whatever’s ready for healing in this person.  Deal?”
It/Them:  “Okay.  Deal.”

And so we begin.  Yes, it’s hokey.  No, I don’t care.  That’s really how it goes.  Well, maybe with more humility and respect and less yelling on my part.  And a ‘please’ or two.  But pretty close.  Then, I rely on SourcePoint scans to tell me where to begin and where to go next.  When I was in SoucePoint classes, scanning was described with colors.  White, then gray, then black.  Work where the biggest black spot is.  For me, it shows up kinesthetically; I feel a change in density.  Air, then water, then honey.  I work in the sweet spot.

I’m always asking more questions, though.  Sure, the scan said to work on your knee.  But do you have any idea how complicated a knee is?  Four different bones, all with their own rotations and intersections with each other.  There are 8 muscles that pull on the head of the fibula alone, and that’s one of the small bones!  ACLs and MCLs and patellar tendons, along with nerves and blood vessels galore.  So, once again, I ask those healing powers that be, “what now?”  And almost instantly, I get a response.  I don’t hear voices.  And it’s not exactly a vision either, although sometimes a picture of a specific piece of anatomy will pop into my head.  It’s more like there are magnets on my hands and iron on the body part and while my hands are being pulled in a certain direction, I just know how deep I’ll need to go to address this issue.  My friend Kate used to say she got information from her toes.  I’ll go with that.  My toes told me this was more emotional than physical.  My toes told me to pull up a chair ’cause it was going to take a while.  My toes told me to ask about your relationship with your grandmother.  So I listened.  I’ve got some pretty smart toes.  Or you’ve got some pretty smart healing powers on your side.  One of the two, for sure.

I often think of myself as a pipe, or a hose.  All I’m doing is connecting what’s above me, bigger than me, smarter than me, better at healing than me to you.  And my biggest job is to make sure I’m the cleanest, clearest tube I can be, so you get the transmission as close to the original as possible.  Of course, there’s also a huge element of personal responsibility.  If I sever a nerve in your face and you end up unable to smile for the rest of your life, neither you nor a judge will care one bit about how clean a hose I was at the time.  I need to know my shit and to stay on my game, so I do.  That’s my end of the deal.  Clean hose; know my shit.  Pretty easy compared to “heal this person.”  I lucked out in this deal, and I know it.  I’m so grateful for those healing powers that be.  Without them, I’d just be poking around, moving fascia.  Which can feel nice and all, but it’s not exactly healing.

Sometimes, when I ask “what now” I get really strange answers.  Burp out this stagnant energy that’s stuck here.  Sit back and do nothing for a minute while that last bit integrates.  Shake their right leg.  It’s gotten to the point where it’s no longer strange to me, but you can believe it was weird to get those messages when I was straight out of Rolfing school.  Burp?  Really?  We did NOT learn about that in Rolfing school.  Gross.  But sometimes I sneeze or cough or kinda growl instead.  What’s weird anymore?  Sometimes I have to shake my hands and arms to discharge the energy that’s released.  Sometimes I need to sit back for a minute ’cause I feel sick myself.  Thank you, so much, for putting up with me.  Sometimes the answer is “just sit and listen.”  That’s hard for me, and my impatience, but I try.  Sometimes the answer is “scan again” or “go deeper” or “get at this from the other side.”  I do my best to listen.

I keep asking “what now?” until I get the answer, “end the session.”  Then I seal it all up, in the way that I do, with a sacral cradle and setting the diamond points.  You get up and if you’re feeling good, we call it a day.  Well, at least you do.  I then get ready for the next session of burping, shaking, and being the best hose I can be.

P.S.  and then some.

Demo Day is next Wednesday!
If you know anyone who wants to try Rolfing and SourcePoint but is afraid to commit to a whole session, this is their chance.  30 minute trial sessions for $10 on Wednesday, March 14th at 662 Grant Street.  Have them give me a call at 303-261-2568 or shoot me an email at t.zordan@gmail.com to schedule.  New clients only, please.

Yoga Instructor Appreciation Week is over tomorrow.
And I’m so sad!  It’s been an absolute blast getting to know and working with all these Denver yogis.  Thanks for your help getting the word out!

I’m visiting my brother in France!
I’ll be out of town March 27th through April 11th, so please keep that in mind if you’re planning to schedule something soon.

Calling all yoga teachers! Hey there, you.  How’s it going?  If you’re not a yoga fan, and know absolutely nobody who’s a yoga fan, you can skip this paragraph.  Then again, if you don’t know anybody who’s a yoga fan, you either don’t live in Colorado, or you need to get out more.  I’m not trying to be harsh, but it’s true.  Anyways.  Back to the task at hand.  I’m celebrating yoga teachers for a whole week!  I’m calling it…wait for it…wait for it…Yoga Instructor Appreciation Week!  YIAW!  Karate kick optional.  These are the details:  March 1st through March 7th.  $50 sessions.  If you teach yoga, this applies to you.  If you have a friend who teaches yoga, this applies to them.  If you have a yoga teacher, this applies to them, too.  I think you’ve got the idea.  So, if you (or your friend or your teacher) wants a session during this special week, let me know.

Thanks for your help making both Demo Days last week a success!  Next month’s Demo Day will be on Wednesday March 14th.  And it may be the last.  I’m thinking about ending this whole Demo Day thing.  I’m feeling like it’s run its course.  At the same time, I have a lot of fun with them, and it’s not like it’s any trouble for me to host them.  What do you think?  Keep ‘em or let ‘em go?  Weigh in now or risk losing Demo Days forever.

Now, for all the lovely ladies.  Starting the day after YIAW ends (March 8th) is WISH.  Holy acronyms, Batman!  The Women’s International Summit on Health is  an online telesummit that I listened to last year and I thought it was so amazing that I’m sharing it with you this year.  It’s free.  It’s wacky.  It’s fun.  And it’s crazy informative.  It works like this: you sign up to listen to calls for 40 days (or you can listen to 3 in a row if you get behind).  40 different experts; 40 different topics related to women’s health.  The calls are between 30 minutes and an hour long, if I remember correctly.  The topics span a bunch of categories including wisdom, food, relationships, beauty, fitness, abundance, sensuality, health, and attitude.  And while I’m not saying I’ll agree with everything every speaker has to say, I do remember being totally excited about the summit last year.  It changed the way I think about a lot of things.  And, if you’re listening this year, we can talk about it when you come in for your sessions.  So, if you want to be a part of it this year, go here and sign up.  Again, it’s free, so if it turns out you hate it after the first week, you can just stop listening to the calls, with no loss to you.

That’s all I’ve got for you this week, gorgeous!  Catch ya next time!

Happy Valentine’s Day to you!  I’ve said it before.  I’ll say it a million times.  I have the best clients in the world.  Really.  The Best.  And you’re one of them!  I am so, so, so grateful for the opportunity to know you and to work with you.  And, for the opportunity to rub it in my Rolfer friends’ faces that I have better clients than them.  Pretty grateful for that.  Not gonna lie.

The thing is, I love Rolfing and SourcePoint Therapy so much, that I’d be doing it on stray dogs in the street if I didn’t have any clients.   I do it because I love it.  Because I feel like I was made to do this work.  When I finally found this stuff, it was like the clouds parted, and the sun was streaming down, and the angels in heaven started singing and playing their cute little harps.  I just knew this was it.  It was the first time I’d ever thought I could do one thing for the rest of my life without getting bored.  And so far, so good.  I have no plans to retire.  Ever.  I never want to stop.  I do it for love, just like Sara Bareilles.

But it helps to have clients.  While Rolfing my own hands and feet and stray dogs is great (not really), I prefer to have clients to work with.  And being blessed with the most amazingest, awesomest clients in the world doesn’t hurt, either.  It’s just that I learn so much from you, every time we work together.  My understanding of this work, the human body, energy systems, emotions, and myself deepens with every session.  So thank you, thank you, for providing me with such a gift.  You truly are amazing.  One of my mentors in Rolfing school once said, “you don’t have to like your clients, but you do have to love them.”  And lucky me, I get to do both, without even trying!  You are wonderful!  And it’s such a joy, such a delight, to work with you.  I look forward to seeing you every time you come in!!  I get to wake up excited to go to “work,” if you can even call it that!

I love you.  Thanks for making that so easy to do.

 

Also, this:

Coloradans:
Demo Day (in Lafayette) is today!  And Demo Day (in Denver) is tomorrow!  Thank you, Colorado peeps, for all your help in getting the word out to make them successful!

Chicagoans:
The next appointments I have available in Chicago are on Tuesday, March 27th, and Monday through Wednesday, April 9th through 11th.  Let me know if you want one!

Winter is a hard time of year for a lot of people.  Low levels of vitamin D, due to our position in relation to the sun can be one contributor.  Heap on some cold, snowy weather and we start exercising less, decreasing our natural ‘good mood’ chemicals in the brain.  Throw in a pinch of holidays and the attendant difficulties with family members and junk food, and it’s no wonder we’re all wearing our cranky pants.  It’s also easy to withdraw when things get tough.  No, I won’t be able to come to your super bowl party.  I don’t think I’ll go out dancing tonight.  I’d rather stay home, alone, in bed.  Which is fine and all; until it’s not.  Think of this time of year as the emotional equivalent of moving day.  Sure, it’s tough work and there’s a lot to do, but you’re strong and able bodied.  You can carry tons of boxes by yourself.  But you simply cannot move the couch alone.  No matter how strong you are.  It’s just too big and bulky and heavy and you have to turn it just so to get it to fit through the door.  We all have our own emotional couches that we just can’t carry alone.

As members of the human species, we do better when we work together.  And asking for help is a good idea, with physical heavy lifting, as well as the emotional kind.  But as prideful beings, we hate asking for help.  It’s a catch-22, deedlee-doo.  When we’re feeling low, hanging out with a friend can be more helpful than a bottle of prozac or vitamin D supplements, but a lot harder to ask for; which is too bad. ‘Cause no matter what, it’s easier to get the couch up the stairs, through the front door and into just the right spot with a friend (or three) helping you out.  Emotionally, or physically.  But asking for help can make us feel incredibly vulnerable.  And all sorts of old stories can come up about being whiney, or needy, or mopey, or a crybaby, or a Debbie Downer.  So we keep our mouths shut.  And the couch stays out on the sidewalk.  Getting wet and muddy and not helping us feel comfortable in our living rooms.  Blech.

I’m one of those people who really struggles to ask for help.  Always have been.  Probably always will be.  But here’s a trick I learned that’s helped me a lot in recent years.  Think about how you feel when someone asks you for help.  Do you roll your eyes and feel completely put out?  Do you think to yourself “what a whiney, needy, crybaby?”  No, of course you don’t.  You probably feel like:  Yes!  Of course!  I’d love to help!  Why didn’t you ask sooner?  Is there anything else I can do?

See, it feels good to help.  And again, we humans do better when we work together.  Our brains know on a basic level that cooperation increases our chances for survival.  And when you help someone else out, there’s a better chance that person might help you out in return.  I LOVE when people ask me for help.  Want me to teach you some of my awesome dance moves?  Sure!  Need me to translate that letter your Italian lover wrote you?  No problem!  Need a hand with the couch on moving day?  You got it!  Need to lean on me for a bit while you sort this mess out in your head?  Let me grab some tissues and a mug of tea for you!

Whenever I’m feeling like I should just tough it out on my own instead of asking for help, I try to remember how great it feels when people ask me for help.  I turn it around and think of it as doing them a favor.  I’m just trying to make them feel better, by giving them the joy you get from helping.  And they can always say no, but it can’t hurt to ask.  I’m generally surprised at just how willing people are to help.  I just needed to let them know I needed it.  Give it a try, next time you need some help, but are hesitant to ask.  Think about what you would say if a friend asked you for help in the very same way.  Then go ahead and ask for help.

———

Speaking of asking for help, I could use some help myself. The next Demo Days (two in February!) are just around the corner, and I could really use some help making them both a huge success.  The first one is in Lafayette on Tuesday the 14th from 1pm to 6pm.  Next up is Denver’s Demo Day on Wednesday, the 15th from 11am to 8pm.  I still have several spots to fill in each one and I’d love it if you’d send your fabulous friends and family members in to try out this funky thing we do.  30 minute sessions for $10.  You can’t beat the price and it’s a great way to get a taste of Rolfing and SourcePoint without committing to a whole session.  Thanks, in advance, for your help!

SourcePoint Goodness

This is only the tip of the weird ice berg

But we’re mixing it up this time.

This Demo Day is going to be 100% energetic.  SourcePoint Therapy without the Rolfing aspect.  Little or no hands-on work; all energy, all the time.  Oh, and this isn’t just for new clients; this applies to anyone and everyone who’s interested in trying out some energy work.  The other aspects of Demo Day will remain the same.  30 minute sessions, $10 each, in Denver at 662 Grant St. on the second floor.  Call me at 303-261-2568 or email me at t.zordan@gmail.com to set up your appointment.

This is a great opportunity to dive a little deeper into the stranger part of what I do.  Ask the woo-woo questions.  Get your chakras balanced.  Get a scan specifically focused on karmic blockages.  Receive a crescent moon hold and bring in the energy of many goddesses.  What?  I told you it was strange.  This is Demo Day gone granola.  And I know it’s not for everybody.  But if you’re curious, why not give it a try?

This is also perfect for people who aren’t comfortable being touched.  Most people who come to see me for Rolfing are familiar with and comfortable with body work.  But there are a lot of people out there who aren’t thrilled with the idea of a stranger touching them.  This Demo Day is perfect for those people to experience some body therapy without the uncomfortable somebody’s-touching-me thing.  Most people who have some fear around being touched are the very people who need it most.  And this can be a comfortable way to step into that scary place without all the fear.

So, if you’ve got a little hippie in you, come on in for Energetic Demo Day on Monday November 14th.  Next week I’ll be posting a menu of about 10 options for you to choose from for your energy work.  Get ready for the weird, pick the one that speaks to you, and give me a call!  Oh, and as usual, tell your friends!