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Well, it’s clearly summertime.  Between seeing your lovely face at my office, backpacking, weddings, volleyball tournaments, long runs, visits from out-of-towners, and just the general fun of summer, I’ve barely had time to brush my teeth.  Just kidding.  I love brushing my teeth.  But seriously, what a whirlwind.  There’s been so much going on and so much I’ve wanted to write about, so here we go.

First, a very belated, but very heartfelt THANK YOU to everyone who participated in Pay What You Want Week back in April.  As usual, it was an absolute blast.  I can’t think of a better way to celebrate my birthday.  I got to meet so many new people, and see so many others I hadn’t seen in a while.  I have The Best clients.  Thank you for that.

Next, I’m sad to announce that I’ll be moving to a new office location soon.  The building I’m currently in has been sold, so I’ll be out by the end of September.  I’m looking at several options nearby and I’ll keep you posted with changes as I know more.  If anyone has a great space they know about, be sure to get me the deets!

For any of you who are interested in the energy work I include in my sessions, there’s a chance for you to learn to do it yourself September 26-28.  My friend (and my Rolfer) Dave Sheldon is hosting a workshop in Boulder, led by the creator of SourcePoint Therapy himself, Bob Shrei.  It’s open to anyone (not just bodyworkers or medical professionals), so if you’re interested, don’t hesitate!  It costs $500 and you can learn more by contacting Dave directly at 303-519-2412 or email: dave@davesheldon.com.

Lastly, there’s a weekend workshop in November at the Shambhala Mountain Center with Will Johnson, a Rolfer and meditation teacher from Vancouver.  I was on Will’s team last year when he did an 8-day retreat in Crestone and this is a mini-version of that.  If you’d like to do a meditation retreat where your body feels better at the end than the beginning, this is the retreat for you.  More information can be found here.

So those are the highlights.  Like I said, I’ll keep you posted with moving news as things get settled.  Until then, enjoy all the fresh produce of the season!

On the heels of the thrilling decision to strike down DOMA, I find it’s time that I came out of the closet about something myself.  See, when I went to Crestone at the end of April, I got into some pretty out-there stuff.  I started working with Kundalini energy, and got a new animal (King Cobra) in my totem.  Which is not the sort of thing my 15-year-old-self ever thought I would say.  I know I’ve been a hippie, and into some pretty strange stuff for a long time now, but I have this construct of ‘who I am’ that includes words like ‘nerdy’ and ‘freckled’ and ‘Italian’ and sometimes that construct does a double-take when I talk about Kundalini and says, “what did you just say?”

But there it is.  I’ve got some snake energy going on.  Sometimes at the most inopportune moments.  Like while I’m sleeping.  Or in the parking lot of Tokyo Joe’s.  Regardless, I’m excited it’s here and that’s probably a good thing, ’cause it doesn’t seem to be going away.  Why I’m bothering to finally tell you all this, SassyPants, is that it’s shifted my relationship to Rolfing.  I never, ever, ever thought I would tire of Rolfing.  I love Rolfing.  Like, a lot.  But lately, I’ve been feeling a bit hemmed in by the title.  I’ve been wondering if I’ve been limiting myself by only being a Rolfer.  I mean, if someone comes to me for a Rolfing session, and pays me for a Rolfing session, I had better give them a Rolfing session, right?  But who defines what is a Rolfing session?  If I use my elbow at least 51% of the time, does that count as Rolfing?  If I get a vision during a session and say something to the client about it, does that not count as Rolfing?  If I do some energy work during a session, while fulfilling the goals of a Rolfing session, then what?  And it turns out that I don’t really care.  Because I think of myself as a Healer, first and foremost.  Rolfing is just a modality that I happen to know a lot about.  But I also know a fair amount about nutrition, and herbalism, and shamanism, and trauma patterning.  And now, I’m learning a lot about snake energy.

So, what I’m long-windedly trying to say is that I’m looking to try out this new (but not that new) Healer title in addition to the Rolfer title.  I’d like to try working outside the bounds of what the Rolf Institute might consider Rolfing.  And if you’re interested, I’d like your help in that.  First and foremost: if you want ‘regular’ Rolfing sessions, as you’ve had in the past with me, that’s totally cool and no problem and please just proceed as normal.  Secondly, I’d like to do 39 (don’t ask; it makes sense in my head) practice sessions and then reevaluate. In these practice sessions, I’d like to remove the expectations of Rolfing, of goals, of even achieving anything.  I’d like to just see what comes up and what happens.  While I have no idea what might occur in each of these sessions, I can promise you, they won’t be standard Rolfing sessions.

Here’s how I’d like to set it up, if you’re interested in being a Guinea pig.  The first 10 volunteers for an alternate healing session get their sessions for free.  The next 10 pay $20.  The next 9 pay $40.  The idea being that whatever I’m learning how to do here, I’ll get better with practice.  I’d like to allow 2 hours for each of these sessions, even though I have no idea how long they’ll actually last.  It might be 15 minutes; it might be the full 2 hours.

So what do you say?  Wanna help me get some practice in, and maybe get some healing out of the deal?  If so, you can schedule online, as usual.  Select the “Snakey Session” instead of the Rolfing SI or Kick-Ass Rub.  Once I’ve had 39 volunteers, I’ll take the option off.  Or not.  We’ll see.  That’s then.  Not now.

Thanks for listening to my confession.  And thanks, in advance, for your support.

This question came up three (yes, three!) times in one day in my practice and I found it odd.  So I started asking the same question of friends for the following few days.  Ready for the question?  Here it is:  On a scale of zero to one hundred, where would you say your heart is?  Let’s calibrate the scale, shall we?  Zero is drawbridge up, moat filled with alligators, and an armed gunman on every parapet.  Not to mention the reinforced concrete walls, the electrified barbed wire, and the cannons loaded and ready to fire.  Oh, and dragons; lots of dragons.  On the other end of the spectrum at one hundred, what we have is more open and welcoming than a puppy dog.  You’re more vulnerable and less protected than a baby.  You’re an overripe peach, without skin.  Anything and everything that wants to get in is getting in, and you’re not even going to raise a tiny baby fist in protest.

I hope that for all of us, this is a question where the answer changes hour to hour and day to day, based on the situation.  Obviously we’re not going to go argue about the cable bill with our hearts at 100.  And hopefully, when you hang out with your bestie or your favorite pet, your heart’s not in full-lockdown mode.  But, on average, say for the last week, where would you put your heart?  I don’t really care where it was when you were 3.  Or where you hope it will be when you’re 90.  Or if it wasn’t for that stupid ex-husband of yours, it would be at 70, but now it’s at 31.  Tell me where you’re at, right now, in this life you’re currently living.  Or better yet, tell yourself.  Are you on the open and vulnerable side with 50 or above?  Are you closed and protected with 49 or less?  Much more importantly, do you feel comfortable moving around on that scale?

Once, I read about a study which showed that a heart which oscillates between beating fast and beating slowly is healthier than a heart that stays at a constant, calm rate.  (If I could find that study for you now, I would link to it, but alas; my 92 seconds of googling came up with nothing; I got frustrated, and I decided to just write this post instead.)  This report I read made the point that while we typically assume it’s better to be calm and even keel all the time, this is just not true.  Getting all worked up, whether it be physically or emotionally, is actually better for your heart, as long as you also have periods of rest and relaxation where your heart rate comes back down.  Living this way allows your heart to learn a sort of flexibility so that the highs aren’t so shocking and exhausting when they happened.

I feel like this applies to pretty much everything.  I don’t like air conditioning because I want to be hot in the summer.  It’s summer!  This is when you’re supposed to be hot!  I like to work out super hard, then sit on the porch talking with friends for hours.  I tend to get carried away when I cook and I have to remind myself that just because you can put every single one of the spices in a meatloaf doesn’t mean you should.  And at the same time, I’m perfectly happy eating plain crackers for dinner.  Go to extremes, then find middle ground.

Same goes for your emotional, energetic heart.  Your life experiences and your current outlook have led you to whatever number you came up with regarding the openness of your heart.  No biggie.  No need to judge yourself, or flaunt your number.  No number is better than any other (except 9, which is just the coolest number on the planet, but not any extra cool for this exercise).  What’s more important is, can you move from that number, when it’s appropriate?  26 may be a super comfortable place for you right now.  Safe, but not on full-lockdown.  Guarded, but you’ve got a good reason for that.  However, when the love of your life appears, do you have the ability to open up a bit more?  Can you get to 54 so they can squeeze through the door?  And if 78 is where you normally hang out, do you know how to draw things in a bit, when necessary?  Can you hear criticism without it destroying your whole week?  Are your boundaries well defined and well protected, in case an ill-wishing marauder comes your way?

If so, hooray!  You’re like a heart olympian!  If not, what stretches can you do to increase your emotional flexibility?  Imagine scenarios where your heart moves towards the bigger numbers along the spectrum.  Picture your heart lowering the drawbridge, putting the dragons out to pasture, and taking off the suit of armor.  What have you been missing out on, that can now come in?  Now go towards the itty, bitty numbers, put that chain mail back on, and grab your sword.  What challenges can you meet face first, with your heart protected like this?

Going back to your original number; is that something you’re happy about?  Are you comfortable there?  Does that rating of openness serve you well?  Again, if so, then super-duper!  If not, now may be a good time to point your nose towards the end of the spectrum you’d like to be closer to.  One day at a time, one decimal point at a time, make an effort to get your heart to a number that better suits you.  And remember, while it might be scary, it’s probably not a bad idea to Love Love Love.

Last night I sat down to write a newsletter about scarcity versus abundance.  Three paragraphs in, I decided to try a different approach.  Three paragraphs after that, I decided to try a different topic.  After a while, I just stopped.  As I climbed into bed, mad at myself for not having finished writing today’s newsletter, I realized the problem:  something else was on my mind.  Something else has been on my mind for about a week now, to be honest.

I got a call last week from one of my instructors at the Rolf Institute.  Apparently there’s been some discussion on the Rolf Forum about this video of mine, called “What Should I Expect From Rolfing?”  I made this video simply because I had about 20 people in a row come in for their first session and say to me at the end, “Well, that wasn’t what I was expecting.”  I thought that people should have a better understanding of what they were getting into before they came for a session.  Also, I figured it would help weed out the people who weren’t a good fit for my style of working.  I think it’s been doing its job because nowadays, pretty much every new client I get, I absolutely love, right off the bat.  There have been a lot of perfect fits, at least from my point of view, which is super awesome.  Less people wasting their money on the wrong Rolfer.  Less people spending an hour and a half thinking, “This isn’t what I was expecting!”  More people thinking, “Ah, this is just what I wanted!”  Seems like a good thing all around.

And yet, there’s this argument going on.  Let me explain.  The Rolf Forum was created back when the interweb was new, as a way to connect the (relatively small) Rolfer community.  To date there are just barely 1800 Certified Rolfers™ in the whole world.  Put a few hundred in Japan, a bunch in Europe and Canada, some in Brazil and Bali and Australia, and it can start to feel kinda lonely being a Rolfer.  I know it’s hard to believe, here in Colorado, where the Rolf Institute is located and there’s a Rolfer on every corner.  But there are zero Rolfers in Mississippi.  And two in Indiana (and they’re both named Dan; weird).  So the internet brought all these isolated Rolfers together to talk about questions they’d had or struggles with their practices or new research being done they wanted to share.  I’ll be honest:  I’ve never been on the Rolf Forum.  Don’t even know where to find it.  Not because I don’t want to connect with other Rolfers, but because my network of Rolfers is more personal and specific.  I feel very comfortable calling or emailing my instructors and mentors if I have a question or concern.  My classmates make the perfect network when I have a practice building question, or just want to geek out about Rolfing for a bit.  I call Sasha and Laura up, or better yet, we get together for beers when we’re in the same state.  I trade sessions with a few different Rolfers, and we ask all the questions we have, during those sessions.  I waste enough time on Facebook, thank you very much, and I don’t feel the need for another place to spend time online.  So it’s not out of disrespect for the Forum that I’ve never been on it; I just don’t seem to need it in my life.

But my instructor called me because my little video had started an argument on the Forum.  Apparently there are some Rolfers who don’t think what I’m doing is Rolfing.  Ida Rolf never talked about energy work, on video, at least.  There are plenty of quotes from her about energy fields and energy work in books, but she was trying to be seen as credible as she created this new form of bodywork in the 60′s and energy work didn’t go over so great with the medical community at the time.  Damn hippies.  Dr. Rolf put a great deal of energy into explaining things in structural terms and making sure her students were well educated in anatomy and physiology.  She wasn’t going to have people talking about pushing on the thingy until it felt squishy.  So, the argument goes, if Ida didn’t want to talk about energy work in her videos, why should I?  And there’s also the question of brand identity.  If someone goes to see a Rolfer in Minnesota, then moves to Denver and wants a Rolfer here, so comes to see me, they’re not going to get the same thing they got in Minnesota.

Well, duh, is what I say to that.  If you go see one doctor, then go see another, you’re not going to get the same thing.  That’s why it’s called a second opinion.  If they were all exactly the same, you wouldn’t bother to get a second opinion.  But just because different doctors do things differently, it doesn’t mean one’s a doctor and one’s not.  And when it comes to me talking about things that Ida wouldn’t…um, I’m not Ida.  Obviously.  I couldn’t be a little old lady from New York if I tried.  I don’t even like New York.  And I’m 5’8″, not 5’2″.  And Zordan’s a funny name, but not in the same way Rolf is.

So, it seems obvious to me, that this is a non-issue.  Yes, I’m a Rolfer.  Yes, I do energy work.  No, I don’t mind talking about it.  But now I want to know what you think.  Is what I do Rolfing?  You’ve had a session from me.  You’ve heard what other people say about Rolfing, and you’ve done your research on Rolfing in general.  Many of you have had Rolfing sessions from other Rolfers.  How do the sessions compare?  Would you say I don’t belong with other Rolfers?  When you get a chance,  post a comment on the blog here.  I’d really love to hear what you think.  And I’ll try to get to scarcity versus abundance soon.  I promise.

Oh, and Demo Day is Saturday.  If you haven’t had a session from me, and you want to try it for yourself, to see if I’m really a Rolfer or not, this is the perfect opportunity.  A 30 minute session for just $10.  There are only 4 spots left, so if you want one, get on it.

While I was in Chicago last week, I got a good question from one of my clients that I thought I’d share:  What happens when a client comes in with no pain?  Short answer:  I get really excited.

Now, for the long answer…

See, most of the people I see in my office are there looking to “fix” something, as you know because you watched last week’s interview, right?.  Your shoulder; your back; your left pinky toe; they all hurt and you want them not to hurt.  Which is great, and I get it.  Pain sucks; you want it to go away.  I want that, too.  And until we get rid of the pain, you’re not going to be able to focus on much else.

But my “real” goal as a Rolfer and as a SourcePoint Therapist is to allow health to manifest.  I want your true self to come forth and shine in its most vibrant form.  Don’t you want that, too?!?  Getting rid of the pain may be the first step in the process, but once that’s accomplished, we can focus on encouraging health and vibrancy.

So when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.  It’s rare, you see, for someone to walk in my door just because they’re curious.  Just because they want to see what this Rolfing thing is all about.  Just because they heard that Rolfing could make you more you.  But when it happens, I love it.  Then, we get down to business.  This particular client, who has no pain, is the perfect candidate for the traditional 10-series because it’s such a thorough full-body tune up.  But 10 sessions is a big commitment and until you’re absolutely ready, it’s not the sort of thing you want to rush into.  So generally, we start the same way I’d start any other session, by setting the 4 diamond points and doing a scan.  Generally when people come in with no physical pain, we get to explore other layers of their being, such as the emotional, traumatic, or karmic blockages that may be preventing health from manifesting.  Often, this is tied up in the physical, but they’re not aware of the holding patterns, so we work on bringing awareness and releasing restrictions.

Working with clients who have no pain can throw me a little off kilter, seeing as I’m so used to working with a goal in mind.  But it also leaves a lot of room for creativity and just trusting the energy to lead me to the right place.  With no goal of “fixing the back pain,” I don’t worry that my own intentions or projections are skewing my intuition or the sourcepoint scans I’m doing.  Everything’s on the table, so to speak.  Nothing is too “off base” to be considered.  So, in the end, when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.

 

Thanks for your help with Demo Day!
Next month there won’t be a Demo Day, but they’ll start back up on June 16th.

Want to learn how to do SourcePoint yourself?
One of the founders of SourcePoint Therapy is coming to Boulder May 18th-20th to teach an introductory class for anyone who wants to take it.  You don’t have to be a bodyworker or healthcare practitioner.  This form of energy work is easy to learn and very powerful for maintaining your own health as well as the health of your family members.  The cost is $375.  For more information, please contact Dave Sheldon at 303-519-2412.

Meditation/Bodywork Retreat
The Posture of Meditation:  Breathing Through the Whole Body.  October 26-November 4th, in Crestone, Colorado with Will Johnson.  Combining meditation techniques with Rolfing.  Participants will receive a Rolfing session every other day for a total of 5 sessions, while spending several hours each day in meditation.  If interested, please let me know.

Once upon a time I wrote an article about plantar fasciitisWhile I found it absolutely brilliant at the time, I have since realized it’s lacking in the practical application department.  Sure, you can get a great basic understanding of what plantar fasciitis is and why you might suffer from it.   And those things are very helpful and all well and good and a wonderful place to start.  In fact, if you have no idea what I’m talking about, go here and read the article now, before you continue on with this little ditty.  But then what?  Yeah, it hurts.  No, I can’t run anymore.  Theresa, are you ever going to tell me what to do about it?

The thing is, since any number of things can cause plantar fasciitis, it’s awfully difficult to give generic advice about.  But I’m going to try.  ‘Cause I’m an overachiever.  So, first things first, we need to figure out where the root or roots of your particular plantar fasciitis may be hiding out.  Let’s start with the most obvious.  Have you injured your foot lately?  Stepped on a big pokey rock while barefoot?  Gone a bit overboard with the salsa dancing?  If so, it’s probably best to use the RICE method for a while.  Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation; just like you would for a sprained ankle.  And we all know that with ice we’re doing 20 minutes on, then 20 minutes off, right?  After 20 minutes of icing something, you start to increase the inflammation, so don’t go pushing this, trying to be an overachiever, too.  After a week or so of the chowing down on your RICE, you can start pushing around in there to see if you’re ready for some soft tissue work.  If it’s still super sore to the touch, keep RICEing ’til it doesn’t.  If you can get a moderately deep foot massage without pain, you’re ready for deep work, if you need it.  If your pain’s gone completely, congrats! you just healed your own plantar fasciitis!  Otherwise, use a tennis ball, standing on it and rolling slowly, slowly over the owie spots to get them to loosen up.  You don’t want to bring back that inflammation, so be careful.

Now, let’s say you have not injured your foot, but you still have plantar fasciits.  This is where it gets tricky.  Naturally, we’re going to be looking along your back line for a super tight spot that could be causing your foot pain.  Starting with your heel and using your fingers (or someone else’s) or a tennis ball dig into your soft tissue (not the bones) slowly working your way up your calf.  Be careful as you get to the knee ’cause there’s a whole bunch of juicy, yet delicate stuff right there in the open at the back of the knee.  In fact, just don’t press into the back of the knee.  It’s not worth the risks.  Then head up your hamstrings, which could take a while as those are some meaty suckers.  Speaking of juicy meat, head north through your glutes, going slow and savory-like.  Next up, low back, heading up to mid, then upper back.  Again, you should be able to manage all this while lying on a tennis ball on the floor, but having a friend do the work for you is extra nice.  If you still haven’t found your “ouchy!” spot, head up (gently!) to the neck, then over the head, all the way to your eyebrows.  If you haven’t found any especially tight spots, you’ve got a catch-22 to deal with.  On the one hand, you’re the only person in the whole country who doesn’t have a single tight spot along their back line.  You should get a prize!  On the other, you still have no idea where your plantar fasciitis is coming from and you’re probably going to require some help from a professional.  Can’t win ‘em all, I suppose.

If, instead, you have found a tight spot, or six, you now know where to focus your efforts.   Loosen up that fascia, nice and slow and easy-like, using that same tennis ball if your hands get tired or you can’t quite reach.  Little bits at a time; like 5 or 10 minutes a day.  Max.  Again, I’m the only overachiever allowed here.  I don’t want you doing more damage than good.  Don’t go pretending you’re a Rolfer.  Besides, when Rolfers work on themselves they tend to get all messed up ’cause they don’t respect their own boundaries and stop when they should.  Better not to go there.  Trust me.

After a week or so working on your trouble areas, you should start to notice a shift in your plantar fasciitis pain.  If not, reevaluate.  Retest your back line and see if maybe your tight spots have moved.  If you feel like you need the help of a professional, give me a call.  You may also have some energetic blockages that need to be cleared and we’ll go into that next.  But if you’re noticing a difference in the right direction, keep up the good work!  Remember not to overdo it, but consistency can go a long way here.

Energetic gunk and plantar fascia.  I don’t have a logical explanation for this, but I do have a story.  My mom called me and told me she had plantar fasciitis and she needed me to fix it.  Lucky for her, I was flying into Chicago the next week and I could take a look.  We did a session.  All went well, but I couldn’t find any outstanding tightness in her back line that pointed to causing this foot pain.  So after the session had a day to settle out I asked how her foot was feeling and she said the pain was still there.  I was heading back to Denver that evening and didn’t have time for another session, nor did I think that would help.  Instead, I asked her to do some energy work on her heel, whenever she could.  I told her to pretend to draw the stuck energy out of the bottom of her heel, as if she were pulling yarn out of a ball.  Just an inch or two at a time, over and over again.  Maybe only 3 minutes at a time, but several times a day.  I told her to do it whenever she sat down.  So she did.  And 2 weeks later, she said it was completely gone.  That was in November and she hasn’t had any problems with it since.  So, hey, why not give it a try?  It’s free, it’s easy, and at least for one person, it worked.

Yes!  I did it!  Practical tips for dealing with plantar fasciitis!  Done.  Bam.  Oh, and one more.  Call your favorite local Rolfer, if you don’t seem to be making much progress on your own.  She might be able to help you out.

This subject has come up 4 different times, with 4 different people in the last week.  So I figured now was as good a time as any to drag it out into the light. The conversation goes something like this:  “I’m fine with the Rolfing.  I just don’t believe in the energy work.”  Or, more directly, “So, you’re a witch doctor.”  And my favorite, “Weird.  You went directly to where it hurts and I didn’t even tell you.”

And can I just begin with this:  I know it’s weird.  I think it’s weird, too.  It’s just that I happen to like weird stuff.  I was first exposed to SourcePoint Therapy by my hero, my mentor, my greatest instructor at the Rolf Institute, Ray McCall.  And watching him work was amazing, in that we, as students, never had any idea how he knew what he knew.  But when the client got off the table, the results were undeniable.  They looked lighter, freer, easier, and about a foot taller.  It was so weird, and so maddening, because we had no idea how to recreate it in our own clients.  My classmate, Laura, and I commonly remarked that we just knew he had a magic wand somewhere, maybe up his sleeve, or under the table or something, and if only we could get our hands on magic wands of our own, we could be amazing Rolfers, too.

The thing is, it wasn’t too long ago that I thought energy work was for whack jobs.  I used to roll my eyes and nod condescendingly when people talked about moving qi and seeing auras and whatnot.  So if you’re there now, I’m fine with that.  I get it.  I wanted something “real;” something I could touch with my hands.  But now, I can feel energy, and touch it with my hands.  I know it’s real, even if nobody else believes me.  Call it intuition combined with self-esteem.  Call it the placebo effect.  Call it crazy.  It doesn’t matter to me.  This is the way I work.  This is what makes sense for me.  If it bothers you, or offends your sensibilities, or you think I’m wasting your time waving my hands in the air, then you probably shouldn’t be my client.  I’d be happy to refer you to a Rolfer where there will be absolutely no energy work or magic wand waving involved.

But when I get a session that includes energy work, it’s a much more holistic session, than one without.  Yes, we’re working on my back pain and that weird thing my knee does, but we’re also working on the bad ju-ju that’s stuck in my knee contributing to why I keep injuring it.  Which is why I signed up for a SourcePoint class ten days after I graduated as a Rolfer and have been incorporating it in my work ever since.  I called Laura after that class ended and said, “I feel like I got my own magic wand!”  She knew what I was talking about.  Now, when I’m working, I trust the information I receive from the energetic field.  More often than not, it makes for happy, pain-free clients, and that’s what I’m after.  Without SourcePoint, I’d be doing the 10-series, and pretty much only the 10-series.  Despite my love of the 10-series, it’s not for everyone.  Besides, I think the world could use a little more magic, in every aspect of life, so why not have a little more magic in our healing?  So go ahead, call me a witch doctor.  I’ll take it as a compliment.

I know you’ve been dying to know what’s on the menu, so without further ado, here you are:

Energy Work Demo Day

A prix fixe tasting menu for those curious about SourcePoint Therapy with Theresa Zordan

Starters
Diamond Points: setting four points around the body to provide an energetic container for the session  
Blockage Scan: a thorough scan of your body’s energy to find the primary blockage to the flow of information

Entrees-Please Choose One   
Rectangle Points: setting and balancing four points relating to the body’s physical energy; great for pain or after chemotherapy, radiation, or any trauma.  
Navel Point: supporting and encouraging the flow of healing heaven energy in the universe and the body      
Sacral Point and Sacral Diamond: supporting and nourishing the vital life force energy within the body; helpful after any bad falls to the tailbone and for TMJ
Guardian Points: acknowledging and invoking the inherent guardian energy at 15 specific points on the body; stimulating the physical and psychic immune system
Extraction: removal of foreign energies from the body
Stick Figure: reestablishing the basic energetic lines around which bones form; good after having any broken bones or surgeries.
Crescent Moon: creating left-right balance as well as grounding.  Goddess energy for those that are lacking.
Trauma Scan: locating blockages specifically related to traumatic events and addressing the largest of these   
Emotional Scan: locating blockages specifically related to the emotional body and addressing the largest of these  
Karmic Scan: locating blockages specifically relating to karma while addressing the primary blockage of these
Chakra Balancing: addressing all 7 major chakras, from crown to root in order to balance, clear, and awaken
Chef’s Choice: the most necessary of the above entrees, based on the chef’s intuition

Desserts
Sacral Hold: supporting and nourishing the vital earth energy within the body; settles and integrates the nervous system
Diamond Points: reestablishing the four diamond points to bring closure to the session

30-minute sessions.  $10 each.

So what’s your fancy?  A karma scan?  Maybe a sacral diamond?  Call me at 303-261-2568 to schedule your 30 minute energy session for just $10.  Looking forward to seeing you there!

SourcePoint Goodness

This is only the tip of the weird ice berg

But we’re mixing it up this time.

This Demo Day is going to be 100% energetic.  SourcePoint Therapy without the Rolfing aspect.  Little or no hands-on work; all energy, all the time.  Oh, and this isn’t just for new clients; this applies to anyone and everyone who’s interested in trying out some energy work.  The other aspects of Demo Day will remain the same.  30 minute sessions, $10 each, in Denver at 662 Grant St. on the second floor.  Call me at 303-261-2568 or email me at t.zordan@gmail.com to set up your appointment.

This is a great opportunity to dive a little deeper into the stranger part of what I do.  Ask the woo-woo questions.  Get your chakras balanced.  Get a scan specifically focused on karmic blockages.  Receive a crescent moon hold and bring in the energy of many goddesses.  What?  I told you it was strange.  This is Demo Day gone granola.  And I know it’s not for everybody.  But if you’re curious, why not give it a try?

This is also perfect for people who aren’t comfortable being touched.  Most people who come to see me for Rolfing are familiar with and comfortable with body work.  But there are a lot of people out there who aren’t thrilled with the idea of a stranger touching them.  This Demo Day is perfect for those people to experience some body therapy without the uncomfortable somebody’s-touching-me thing.  Most people who have some fear around being touched are the very people who need it most.  And this can be a comfortable way to step into that scary place without all the fear.

So, if you’ve got a little hippie in you, come on in for Energetic Demo Day on Monday November 14th.  Next week I’ll be posting a menu of about 10 options for you to choose from for your energy work.  Get ready for the weird, pick the one that speaks to you, and give me a call!  Oh, and as usual, tell your friends!

What exactly is a Source Point?

Your Source Point is a point just to the right of your navel.  Six to eighteen inches to the right of your navel to be exact.  It’s also called the Blueprint Point or your Order Point.  At the beginning of every session, I set four points around your body, all in relation to your belly button.  The first one is the Source Point, out to the right.

The next three points are below your feet, to the left of your navel, and above your head, all six to eighteen inches from your body.  Below your feet we have the  Grounding or Balance Point.  To your left is the Activation or Harmony Point.  And lastly, above your head is the Transformation or Flow Point.  They form a diamond around you and are therefore called the diamond points.  Everyone thinks this SourcePoint stuff is fancy and complicated, but really it’s just the opposite, which is why I like it so much.  In case you were wondering, they’re gold and tiny, but you can picture them as purple racquetballs if you’d like.  And you (or I) should always set them in the same order.  Right, below the feet, left, above the head. Order, Balance, Harmony, Flow.  It even sounds nice to say!

The diamond points are with you all day, every day.   You had them in the womb, and they’ll stay with you ’til you die.  They’re your container, as well as your connection to the energy field around you.  And even though these points are always with you, we sometimes lose the connection to them.  It’s like an old radio tuner and you’re not quite on the right frequency.  Close enough that you can hear the music; far enough away that it’s all staticky with another station butting in once in a while.  When I’m ‘setting the points,’ I’m just getting you tuned in to precisely the right frequency.

So now you know what I’m doing at the beginning and end of every session.  You can set the points yourself whenever you’d like.  Simply picture them in your imagination, or you can physically try and feel them with the palm of your hand.  You can imagine gold lines connecting each of them, to form the diamond, as well as a cross in the center.  The line from top to bottom is your midline, remember?  Setting your own points can be a great way to bring in a little calm and order if you’re feeling frantic.  I like to set mine if I’m having trouble falling asleep.

Give it a try and tell me what you think.  If you’re having trouble finding or feeling your points, bring it up in your next session and we’ll go over it together.  You’ll soon be on your way to being a SourcePoint Sorcerer yourself!