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Last night I sat down to write a newsletter about scarcity versus abundance.  Three paragraphs in, I decided to try a different approach.  Three paragraphs after that, I decided to try a different topic.  After a while, I just stopped.  As I climbed into bed, mad at myself for not having finished writing today’s newsletter, I realized the problem:  something else was on my mind.  Something else has been on my mind for about a week now, to be honest.

I got a call last week from one of my instructors at the Rolf Institute.  Apparently there’s been some discussion on the Rolf Forum about this video of mine, called “What Should I Expect From Rolfing?”  I made this video simply because I had about 20 people in a row come in for their first session and say to me at the end, “Well, that wasn’t what I was expecting.”  I thought that people should have a better understanding of what they were getting into before they came for a session.  Also, I figured it would help weed out the people who weren’t a good fit for my style of working.  I think it’s been doing its job because nowadays, pretty much every new client I get, I absolutely love, right off the bat.  There have been a lot of perfect fits, at least from my point of view, which is super awesome.  Less people wasting their money on the wrong Rolfer.  Less people spending an hour and a half thinking, “This isn’t what I was expecting!”  More people thinking, “Ah, this is just what I wanted!”  Seems like a good thing all around.

And yet, there’s this argument going on.  Let me explain.  The Rolf Forum was created back when the interweb was new, as a way to connect the (relatively small) Rolfer community.  To date there are just barely 1800 Certified Rolfers™ in the whole world.  Put a few hundred in Japan, a bunch in Europe and Canada, some in Brazil and Bali and Australia, and it can start to feel kinda lonely being a Rolfer.  I know it’s hard to believe, here in Colorado, where the Rolf Institute is located and there’s a Rolfer on every corner.  But there are zero Rolfers in Mississippi.  And two in Indiana (and they’re both named Dan; weird).  So the internet brought all these isolated Rolfers together to talk about questions they’d had or struggles with their practices or new research being done they wanted to share.  I’ll be honest:  I’ve never been on the Rolf Forum.  Don’t even know where to find it.  Not because I don’t want to connect with other Rolfers, but because my network of Rolfers is more personal and specific.  I feel very comfortable calling or emailing my instructors and mentors if I have a question or concern.  My classmates make the perfect network when I have a practice building question, or just want to geek out about Rolfing for a bit.  I call Sasha and Laura up, or better yet, we get together for beers when we’re in the same state.  I trade sessions with a few different Rolfers, and we ask all the questions we have, during those sessions.  I waste enough time on Facebook, thank you very much, and I don’t feel the need for another place to spend time online.  So it’s not out of disrespect for the Forum that I’ve never been on it; I just don’t seem to need it in my life.

But my instructor called me because my little video had started an argument on the Forum.  Apparently there are some Rolfers who don’t think what I’m doing is Rolfing.  Ida Rolf never talked about energy work, on video, at least.  There are plenty of quotes from her about energy fields and energy work in books, but she was trying to be seen as credible as she created this new form of bodywork in the 60′s and energy work didn’t go over so great with the medical community at the time.  Damn hippies.  Dr. Rolf put a great deal of energy into explaining things in structural terms and making sure her students were well educated in anatomy and physiology.  She wasn’t going to have people talking about pushing on the thingy until it felt squishy.  So, the argument goes, if Ida didn’t want to talk about energy work in her videos, why should I?  And there’s also the question of brand identity.  If someone goes to see a Rolfer in Minnesota, then moves to Denver and wants a Rolfer here, so comes to see me, they’re not going to get the same thing they got in Minnesota.

Well, duh, is what I say to that.  If you go see one doctor, then go see another, you’re not going to get the same thing.  That’s why it’s called a second opinion.  If they were all exactly the same, you wouldn’t bother to get a second opinion.  But just because different doctors do things differently, it doesn’t mean one’s a doctor and one’s not.  And when it comes to me talking about things that Ida wouldn’t…um, I’m not Ida.  Obviously.  I couldn’t be a little old lady from New York if I tried.  I don’t even like New York.  And I’m 5’8″, not 5’2″.  And Zordan’s a funny name, but not in the same way Rolf is.

So, it seems obvious to me, that this is a non-issue.  Yes, I’m a Rolfer.  Yes, I do energy work.  No, I don’t mind talking about it.  But now I want to know what you think.  Is what I do Rolfing?  You’ve had a session from me.  You’ve heard what other people say about Rolfing, and you’ve done your research on Rolfing in general.  Many of you have had Rolfing sessions from other Rolfers.  How do the sessions compare?  Would you say I don’t belong with other Rolfers?  When you get a chance,  post a comment on the blog here.  I’d really love to hear what you think.  And I’ll try to get to scarcity versus abundance soon.  I promise.

Oh, and Demo Day is Saturday.  If you haven’t had a session from me, and you want to try it for yourself, to see if I’m really a Rolfer or not, this is the perfect opportunity.  A 30 minute session for just $10.  There are only 4 spots left, so if you want one, get on it.