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Tag Archives: self

Let me guess.  You’re not going to be awesome to your body for the next 6 weeks.  I’m right there with you.  Family obligations and the stress they bring.  Holiday parties with not a vegetable in sight.  A few too many cocktails on New Year’s Eve.  Cold weather keeping you snuggled on the couch instead of walking through the park.  Really, I get it.  I’m challenging myself to go a whole month without eating out.  But I’m not starting until January ’cause I’m not stupid.

On the flip side, I know how crappy I felt last year around this time.  Sluggish.  Achey.  Tired.  Mildly grumpy.  And I don’t want to repeat that.  So I’m committing to do better than last year.  Even if that means I still eat too many Christmas cookies and there is more movie watching than I need.  I’m committing to regular exercise, more vegetables in my meals, and a little less alcohol.  And I’m also committing to regular bodywork.  Now, I know, it’s not fair.  Most of my aches and pains I can take care of myself, while watching a movie, which is awesome.  You, too, should be a Rolfer, and therefore, this lucky.  But still, there’s plenty I can’t take care of myself (or that I’m too lazy to take care of myself), and I need regular maintenance.  I get Rolfed about once a month with occasional cranio-sacral, acupuncture, and chiropractic sessions sprinkled into the mix whenever I can, because feeling good is important to me.

And now for the sales pitch:  May I suggest that you also keep up with whatever self-care schedule works for you, especially during this time of year when we tend to let everything slide?  I promise it’ll help those New Year’s resolutions seem more manageable.  But much more importantly, you’ll feel better, and that should be all the motivation you need.  This is your reminder that I’m offering Pay What You Want for all sessions until the end of the year.  And if you’re one of the lucky ones with a Health Savings Account or a Flexible Spending Account that expires at the end of the year, now would be be the time to use it, before you lose it (even if you use it somewhere other than my office).  I just want all of us to feel good, even through the holidays.

Happy Thanksgiving and may there be a lot of light in your life through these dark days!

I know I’m awesome.  Not to brag or anything, but it’s true.  I’ve worked hard to be awesome.  I follow my passions.  I spend my time doing things and learning about things that are interesting to me.  I invest time and energy into relationships that feed my soul.  I read books that inspire and educate me.  I eat food that gives me energy and vitality.  All the little things I do, all the quirks in my personality, all the experiences I’ve had, add up to awesome.  And why shouldn’t I be awesome?  I’m the best version of me that I can be right now.

And so are you.

Way to be awesome, Sassy Pants.

But the thing is, sometimes I forget how awesome I am.  I lose track of my greatness, just like my keys and my sunglasses.  When I’m hanging around someone who’s clearly smarter than me, I forget that I’m smart.  When I’m surrounded by beautiful people, I forget that I am still beautiful.  When I find myself in the presence of a true comedian, I suddenly feel like a boring lump.  I see a commercial for “So You Think You Can Dance?” and I feel like a robot, and not the dancing kind.  You know how it goes, right?

It’s uncomfortable to be reminded that I’m not the best at something.  But I have to remind myself that just because I’m not the best doesn’t mean I’m not good, or even great.  And when I come from a place of greatness; when I truly stand in my power, I am a better person.  I am more generous.  More kind.  More patient.  More understanding.  Which in turn, makes me more awesome.  When I feel jealous and insignificant and sub-standard, I act accordingly.  I am stingy and cruel and impatient and judgemental.  Which makes me less awesome.  Personally, I’d rather be generous.  I’d rather be kind.  So I will stand in my greatness.  I will own my awesomeness, and in doing so, become more awesome.

I dare you to join me in mutual awesomeness.

While I was in Chicago last week, I got a good question from one of my clients that I thought I’d share:  What happens when a client comes in with no pain?  Short answer:  I get really excited.

Now, for the long answer…

See, most of the people I see in my office are there looking to “fix” something, as you know because you watched last week’s interview, right?.  Your shoulder; your back; your left pinky toe; they all hurt and you want them not to hurt.  Which is great, and I get it.  Pain sucks; you want it to go away.  I want that, too.  And until we get rid of the pain, you’re not going to be able to focus on much else.

But my “real” goal as a Rolfer and as a SourcePoint Therapist is to allow health to manifest.  I want your true self to come forth and shine in its most vibrant form.  Don’t you want that, too?!?  Getting rid of the pain may be the first step in the process, but once that’s accomplished, we can focus on encouraging health and vibrancy.

So when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.  It’s rare, you see, for someone to walk in my door just because they’re curious.  Just because they want to see what this Rolfing thing is all about.  Just because they heard that Rolfing could make you more you.  But when it happens, I love it.  Then, we get down to business.  This particular client, who has no pain, is the perfect candidate for the traditional 10-series because it’s such a thorough full-body tune up.  But 10 sessions is a big commitment and until you’re absolutely ready, it’s not the sort of thing you want to rush into.  So generally, we start the same way I’d start any other session, by setting the 4 diamond points and doing a scan.  Generally when people come in with no physical pain, we get to explore other layers of their being, such as the emotional, traumatic, or karmic blockages that may be preventing health from manifesting.  Often, this is tied up in the physical, but they’re not aware of the holding patterns, so we work on bringing awareness and releasing restrictions.

Working with clients who have no pain can throw me a little off kilter, seeing as I’m so used to working with a goal in mind.  But it also leaves a lot of room for creativity and just trusting the energy to lead me to the right place.  With no goal of “fixing the back pain,” I don’t worry that my own intentions or projections are skewing my intuition or the sourcepoint scans I’m doing.  Everything’s on the table, so to speak.  Nothing is too “off base” to be considered.  So, in the end, when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.

 

Thanks for your help with Demo Day!
Next month there won’t be a Demo Day, but they’ll start back up on June 16th.

Want to learn how to do SourcePoint yourself?
One of the founders of SourcePoint Therapy is coming to Boulder May 18th-20th to teach an introductory class for anyone who wants to take it.  You don’t have to be a bodyworker or healthcare practitioner.  This form of energy work is easy to learn and very powerful for maintaining your own health as well as the health of your family members.  The cost is $375.  For more information, please contact Dave Sheldon at 303-519-2412.

Meditation/Bodywork Retreat
The Posture of Meditation:  Breathing Through the Whole Body.  October 26-November 4th, in Crestone, Colorado with Will Johnson.  Combining meditation techniques with Rolfing.  Participants will receive a Rolfing session every other day for a total of 5 sessions, while spending several hours each day in meditation.  If interested, please let me know.

Once upon a time I wrote an article about plantar fasciitisWhile I found it absolutely brilliant at the time, I have since realized it’s lacking in the practical application department.  Sure, you can get a great basic understanding of what plantar fasciitis is and why you might suffer from it.   And those things are very helpful and all well and good and a wonderful place to start.  In fact, if you have no idea what I’m talking about, go here and read the article now, before you continue on with this little ditty.  But then what?  Yeah, it hurts.  No, I can’t run anymore.  Theresa, are you ever going to tell me what to do about it?

The thing is, since any number of things can cause plantar fasciitis, it’s awfully difficult to give generic advice about.  But I’m going to try.  ‘Cause I’m an overachiever.  So, first things first, we need to figure out where the root or roots of your particular plantar fasciitis may be hiding out.  Let’s start with the most obvious.  Have you injured your foot lately?  Stepped on a big pokey rock while barefoot?  Gone a bit overboard with the salsa dancing?  If so, it’s probably best to use the RICE method for a while.  Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation; just like you would for a sprained ankle.  And we all know that with ice we’re doing 20 minutes on, then 20 minutes off, right?  After 20 minutes of icing something, you start to increase the inflammation, so don’t go pushing this, trying to be an overachiever, too.  After a week or so of the chowing down on your RICE, you can start pushing around in there to see if you’re ready for some soft tissue work.  If it’s still super sore to the touch, keep RICEing ’til it doesn’t.  If you can get a moderately deep foot massage without pain, you’re ready for deep work, if you need it.  If your pain’s gone completely, congrats! you just healed your own plantar fasciitis!  Otherwise, use a tennis ball, standing on it and rolling slowly, slowly over the owie spots to get them to loosen up.  You don’t want to bring back that inflammation, so be careful.

Now, let’s say you have not injured your foot, but you still have plantar fasciits.  This is where it gets tricky.  Naturally, we’re going to be looking along your back line for a super tight spot that could be causing your foot pain.  Starting with your heel and using your fingers (or someone else’s) or a tennis ball dig into your soft tissue (not the bones) slowly working your way up your calf.  Be careful as you get to the knee ’cause there’s a whole bunch of juicy, yet delicate stuff right there in the open at the back of the knee.  In fact, just don’t press into the back of the knee.  It’s not worth the risks.  Then head up your hamstrings, which could take a while as those are some meaty suckers.  Speaking of juicy meat, head north through your glutes, going slow and savory-like.  Next up, low back, heading up to mid, then upper back.  Again, you should be able to manage all this while lying on a tennis ball on the floor, but having a friend do the work for you is extra nice.  If you still haven’t found your “ouchy!” spot, head up (gently!) to the neck, then over the head, all the way to your eyebrows.  If you haven’t found any especially tight spots, you’ve got a catch-22 to deal with.  On the one hand, you’re the only person in the whole country who doesn’t have a single tight spot along their back line.  You should get a prize!  On the other, you still have no idea where your plantar fasciitis is coming from and you’re probably going to require some help from a professional.  Can’t win ‘em all, I suppose.

If, instead, you have found a tight spot, or six, you now know where to focus your efforts.   Loosen up that fascia, nice and slow and easy-like, using that same tennis ball if your hands get tired or you can’t quite reach.  Little bits at a time; like 5 or 10 minutes a day.  Max.  Again, I’m the only overachiever allowed here.  I don’t want you doing more damage than good.  Don’t go pretending you’re a Rolfer.  Besides, when Rolfers work on themselves they tend to get all messed up ’cause they don’t respect their own boundaries and stop when they should.  Better not to go there.  Trust me.

After a week or so working on your trouble areas, you should start to notice a shift in your plantar fasciitis pain.  If not, reevaluate.  Retest your back line and see if maybe your tight spots have moved.  If you feel like you need the help of a professional, give me a call.  You may also have some energetic blockages that need to be cleared and we’ll go into that next.  But if you’re noticing a difference in the right direction, keep up the good work!  Remember not to overdo it, but consistency can go a long way here.

Energetic gunk and plantar fascia.  I don’t have a logical explanation for this, but I do have a story.  My mom called me and told me she had plantar fasciitis and she needed me to fix it.  Lucky for her, I was flying into Chicago the next week and I could take a look.  We did a session.  All went well, but I couldn’t find any outstanding tightness in her back line that pointed to causing this foot pain.  So after the session had a day to settle out I asked how her foot was feeling and she said the pain was still there.  I was heading back to Denver that evening and didn’t have time for another session, nor did I think that would help.  Instead, I asked her to do some energy work on her heel, whenever she could.  I told her to pretend to draw the stuck energy out of the bottom of her heel, as if she were pulling yarn out of a ball.  Just an inch or two at a time, over and over again.  Maybe only 3 minutes at a time, but several times a day.  I told her to do it whenever she sat down.  So she did.  And 2 weeks later, she said it was completely gone.  That was in November and she hasn’t had any problems with it since.  So, hey, why not give it a try?  It’s free, it’s easy, and at least for one person, it worked.

Yes!  I did it!  Practical tips for dealing with plantar fasciitis!  Done.  Bam.  Oh, and one more.  Call your favorite local Rolfer, if you don’t seem to be making much progress on your own.  She might be able to help you out.