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Alright.  We’re going to streamline this and I’m going to talk about Sessions Eight and Nine at the same time.  Laziness and efficiency are super closely related.  Trust me on this one.

So, with the start of Session Eight, we are officially finished with the core sessions and into the integration sessions.  And, as my hero Rolfer, Ray McCall says, “With Session Eight, the trail thins out a bit.” In Sessions One through Seven, there’s a clearly defined ‘territory’ of the body we’re working with.  There are clearly defined goals.  With Sessions Eight and Nine, there’s a lot more that depends on each individual’s circumstances, so these sessions are very customized.  Basically, we’re trying to differentiate anything that has not yet been differentiated in the previous seven sessions.  And integrate all these new changes so that they’re comfortable and easy for your body to use.  As it’s taught to newbie Rolfers, there’s usually an upper body session and a lower body session.  But it can be two middles.  It can be a left side and a right side.  It can be a right lower and a left middle.  And as Ray also likes to say, “You get to vote, but I get to decide.”  Not to remind you of our current political situation or anything.  So, this is when I really, really want to know what you think is still missing.  What still needs attention?  Was there a session you felt ended way too soon?  What area of your body still feels neglected or stuck?  I’m going to make the final decision about what needs work, and in what order, but I really do want to know what you’re missing because these two sessions are our last chance before the end of the series.  Session Ten is not for new projects.

Because Sessions Eight and Nine don’t have well defined territories or goals beyond differentiation and integration, they’re a little tricky to talk about.  But basically, I just want to see all the parts of your whole body working well together.  I want your core to be able to express through your sleeve without restriction or distortion.  I might ask you to walk or do some other diagnostic tests to see what looks restricted or where movement has to go around instead of through.  There are some really funky positions I might put you in during these sessions, too, trying to link everything up.  These are not your standard “face up” or “face down” positions, but rather “while on your stomach, turn your head to the right, raise your right arm up by your head, bring your left arm down by your side, turn your hips so that your left hip is on the table, while your right hip is stacked above it, bring your left knee up towards your chest and straighten your right leg a little behind your (quite twisted by now) midline.”  Go ahead and try it.  I’ll wait.  It’s easier with help from your Rolfer, but it’s always a little awkward.

When it was time for Dave and me to trade Session Eight, I was ready for some body work.  Before Session Eight, I had fallen twice while running and my left shoulder was bothering me.  Dave started working on that left shoulder and I got all emotional, which was surprising but not uncomfortable.  It passed fairly quickly.  After the session, I felt relaxed and open.  My upper body felt spacious, my shoulders were back without any effort, my head was upright, and for some reason it felt like there was more space between my teeth.  I haven’t had any shoulder pain since, so I’d call that a win.

When we traded Session Nine, I actually wasn’t desperate for bodywork.  I felt really good walking into the session, with nothing calling for attention, so I guess I was almost ready to be done with the series.  Since I wasn’t in any physical discomfort, and things felt like they were moving well together, Dave was free to do a very energetic session, just using SourcePoint Therapy and his intuition to guide him.  Over and over again, I felt big waves of tension being released that I hadn’t known were there.  Big breaths, neck stretching, and hip wiggling were my contribution to the work.  Afterwards, I felt like popped popcorn: expanded in every direction.  I felt light and calm and easy like no problem was too big or heavy or serious.  I felt like my emotions could just flow through me instead of getting stuck and spinning around.  So basically, no complaints.

Sessions Eight and Nine are where the art of Rolfing comes into play.  We get to leave the formulas behind and play with the beauty of the body.  It’s a magical part of the series, even if it’s a little hard to talk about.

Ugh.  Writing about Session Five has been Such. A. Struggle.   I may be guilty of some perfectionistic tendencies.  And I really love Session Five and want to do it justice, honoring its magic.  But it’s also this deep session, at the core of the 10-series that works on the center of the body, corresponding to central aspects of our emotional beings.  Which all leads to me not having the easiest time writing about this gorgeous session.  But I’m going to try.

In Session Five we’re hitting the reset button.  We’re awakening the core.  We’re asking “Who am I?” relative to the inside self, the center, to instinct and vulnerability.  This is a core/sleeve session.  This is a top/bottom session.  This is a front/back session.  In other words, this session is the motherlode.  No wonder I love this session.

The main focus of Session Five, structurally, is the psoas, a muscle I didn’t even know existed before I first got Rolfed.  But now, I know and love the psoas, and hopefully you will, too.  The psoas is this beautiful muscle, or really, there are two, matching beautiful muscles, the psoai.  They run from the front and sides of the lumbar vertebrae (and the last thoracic vertebra), down through the pelvis and connect to the tops of the femurs.  Here’s a drawing of the psoai with their partners in pelvis stability, the illiacus muscles, which also get attention in Session Five:

The psoai are strong, long, and luscious.  Or, at least they should be.  Most of us spend so much time sitting that we have shorter than ideal psoai and they tend to be locked and loaded all the time, without the ability to relax and lengthen.  When you lift your leg in front of you, to go up a stair, for instance, your psoas is one of the main muscles responsible for that action.  And when you swing your leg behind you, to take a long, graceful step, for instance, your psoas needs to relax and lengthen.  Did you know your legs start above your belly-button?  Because they do, and the psoas is the muscle responsible for that.  I’ve found in my practice that overly tight and shortened psoas muscles are responsible for almost all the low-back pain I ever see, and I see a lot of low-back pain.  Shortened psoas muscles can also lead to hip pain, groin pain, sciatica, neck pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, restricted breathing, and jaw pain.  It seems like a pretty important muscle.  Oh, and to get to the psoas, we have to work through 4 layers of more superficial abdominal muscles and around the majority of your viscera (organs), just for funsies.  Session Five is amazing, but I never said it was comfortable.

Session Five goals (beside simply loving the psoas) include:

  • increased anterior-posterior (front to back) depth; (remember that Double Stuf Oreo we started working on in Session Three?)
  • to begin helping the core space open from the pelvic floor to the roof of the mouth
  • balancing the relationship of the thorax (rib cage) to the pelvis
  • establishing the front of the spine
  • having the legs function from the lumbo-dorsal hinge (at the bottom of the ribs)

We are working here with the front of the back and the back of the front.  What’s more representative of the front of the back than a muscle that connects to the front of the spine, but is considered an abdominal muscle (as opposed to a back muscle)?  When I first learned about the psoas, this concept blew my mind.  I’d never thought about the front of my spine before.  I don’t think it had occurred to me that my spine HAD a front.  Obviously, it does.  I just hadn’t thought about it.  This is the core of the core.  This muscle is the physical embodiment of the place between future and past, between top and bottom, and is literally at our center.  This is the session where we ask questions like:  What is core?  What is surface?  Where and how do they connect?  Are they balanced in relation to each other?

Naturally, on a personal level, I was interested to see if and how this session, with it’s deep abdominal focus would effect my ‘hip thing.’  And I’m always down for a little exploration around “Who am I, really?”  So I was excited to receive Session Five.  It did not disappoint.  As per usual, Dave worked his magic.  Some standard, structural Rolfing with a nice mix of SourcePoint to clear out some fear I didn’t know was hiding in my abdomen.  I got up from the table after receiving Session Five and started singing “I’ve got no strings” from Pinocchio.  Seriously.  My joints all felt so smooth and loose, without being floppy or sloppy.  And I felt a lot taller, and longer along my whole front, as if I’d been unzipped from a too-tight casing.  This is what I felt like:  I took a little walk around Dave’s office and felt so upright and tall, with my shoulders effortlessly back behind me, instead of rounding forward.  My feet were contacting the ground well and comfortably.  It was amazing.  And two weeks later, I still had no trouble with my ‘hip thing.’  Since Session Five, though, I have had a lot of internal and emotional upheaval.  A lot of questioning around what’s really important to me and whether or not my life reflects those things.  Questions around integrity and long-term happiness and fulfillment.  Again, this session is amazing (and obviously important), but not necessarily comfortable.  I’m grateful for the experience.  Session Five rules.

 

Truth be told, I hated Session Three.  Both the first time I received it and while learning about it in Rolfing school, I hated it.  Like, with a fiery passion, I hated it.  Not that it was Session Three’s fault.  It was my armpits’ fault.  But the hatred toward Three was real and deep.  Allow me to explain.  

I have the most ticklish armpits of anyone I’ve ever known.  And I’ve known a lot of people.  And just in case you’re one of those people who isn’t ticklish and thinks it soooo funny to tickle people, it’s not.  Just because I’m laughing does NOT mean it’s fun for me.  Having my armpits tickled is (thankfully) the closest I’ve come to being tortured.  And getting back on topic, Session Three deals with the armpits.  Or axillary region if you want to get technical.

I have been told that Session Three deals with a lot more than just the armpits.  It deals with the sides of the body, all the way from the head to the toes, with the goal of making more space from front to back.  My teacher said, we’re making the Oreo into a Double Stuf Oreo.  But all I could focus on was the armpit, and I really like Oreos.  That first time I went through the 10-series, I had no idea what was coming and I probably still owe apologies to the 7 other people getting their Session Threes at the same time in that classroom.  The shrieks and yelps that came from me were certainly not health inducing for the others made to listen.  And my poor Rolfer probably just wanted to pin me to the table to get me to stop squirming and jumping away from her. 

It turns out that the tickle reflex is mostly protective.  At least, that’s what I’ve found with my clients and myself.  Just beneath the tickle is the pain, if you can get there.  So while my worst nightmare was my Rolfer working on my armpits, what I needed most was also my Rolfer working on my armpits.  Go figure.  But with every Session Three I’ve received, the process has gotten easier.  I’ve since made my peace with Session Three.  And this time through, I actually loved it.  I didn’t think that was even an option!

While I had my usual dread regarding receiving Session Three this time, I also knew that I could really use some armpit work, specifically on my left side.  I’d noticed in the last few weeks that my left shoulder was slowly but steadily getting less mobile.  I couldn’t remember injuring it, but my range of motion was shrinking to the point where I could no longer reach my arm up overhead or behind me.  I was starting to feel like the Tin Man searching for his oil can.  By the time Dave was done working with me (only one little yelp per armpit!), I was ready to get back to climbing trees and swinging on the monkey bars.  Hooray!  And after the session I had the deepest sense of vertical I can remember ever having.  As if every cell in my whole body was suddenly organized around a plumb line dropped from the center of my head.  It was super cool.  

Many people who are not me find Session Three to be an incredible session, even on their first go around, as we really start to get into the structures that aren’t addressed in a typical massage.  One of the assessment tools, looking at a profile view, is something you can do yourself with a full-length mirror.  Stand with one of your profiles to the mirror, preferably wearing clothing that shows your body pretty well.  See that ankle bone sticking out?  Draw a vertical line up through that bone.  Is the center of your knee on that line?  What about your hip joint?  What about your shoulder?  And your ear?  Which ones are in front of the line?  Which ones are behind?  That’s the stuff we’re addressing in Session Three.  (If you’re perfectly lined up, I want to see it.  And we can probably just call you done with no need to finish the 10-series.)  During Session Three, the client is lying on one side or the other for most of it and we get to work (in addition to the armpit) on the rib cage, the relationship of the shoulder to the neck, the ribs, and the arm, and the pelvic girdle and how it relates to the ribs and the leg.  There’s a big focus on the tiniest of our ribs, number 12, and the quadratus lumborum, a nifty muscle in the low back.  In Session Three, we’re wrapping up the “sleeve” or “superficial” sessions and prepping the body for the “core” sessions to come.  When I could finally stop focusing on the horrors of the armpit work and see the session as a whole, I realized that Session Three might be the coolest session of the whole 10-series, in that it does a great job of addressing the whole body, from a really interesting position (side-lying), something that I can’t find a comparison to in any other session.  Neato.

If you’ve been with me for a while, you know the drill: my birthday is coming up and I’m celebrating with Pay What You Want Week, the first week of May. If you are new around these parts, well, the same is still true. I’m turning 35 (halfway to 70, baby!) and I’m giving you presents. Well, just one present, to be specific. Pay What You Want Week is just what it sounds like. For the first week of May, the 1st through the 7th, you can schedule a Rolfing session with me as you normally would, but pay whatever you’d like when it’s all done. Want to pay in cookies? You can do that. Want to pay in fairy sprinkles? Totally an option. Want to pay with a song and a dance? I’m down. Want to pay a dollar amount of your choice? That works, too. The only rule is that you keep in mind that I share a 450 square foot apartment with a person, a dog, a cat, and three fish. I have no room for stuff. Please no stuff. (Fairy sprinkles don’t count as stuff.)

So go ahead. Schedule your Pay What You Want session for the week of May 1st through May 7th and I’ll see you then!

I feel like I wrote this article already.  But when I went searching through the archives, I couldn’t find it.  Maybe I’ve just explained it so many times that it feels like I’ve written this article.  Or maybe I did write it, but I titled it something like “Plantar Fasciitis,” which makes no sense whatsoever, but it could’ve happened, I’m not going to lie.  Regardless, I’m going to write this article now.

Here’s my thing about referrals:  I love referrals.  Duh.  What business owner doesn’t?  I love referrals not just in a referrals-mean-more-clients-which-is-good-for-my-business sort of way, although that’s true.  There’s also the aspect of referrals-mean-I-get-to-help-more-people-live-their-lives-without-pain, which is awesome.  But really, the number one reason I love referrals is that people who come to me through a referral already know what they’re signing up for, at least to some degree.

I do my best on my website and on the blog and on the phone to prepare new clients for what they’re getting into when they come in for a session.  But there’s something about having a friend explain to you what it was like for them that helps people understand it all better than I can ever seem to achieve.  Which is great, ’cause a session with me can be pretty intense or weird or overwhelming (or all of the above) as it is; nobody needs the added factor of surprise.  So for the lack-of-surprise factor, I love referrals.

That being said, I don’t have a referral rewards program.  You know; send 3 friends, get a free session.  Or for every person you refer, you get $10 off your next session.  Trust me, I’ve thought about it.  I think about it often, in fact.  The number one reason I haven’t instituted a referral rewards program is privacy.

Here’s a hypothetical story.  (I do have a sister named Anna and she does have a friend named Gina, but I’ve never seen Gina as a client, and if I had, I’d never tell you about it, I promise.)  Let’s say that my sister Anna refers her friend Gina to come see me.  Great!  Gina comes to see me, and while we’re going over her initial intake, we come across the vey embarrassing problem she’s been having with incontinence lately.  This is something we can work with and try to resolve with Rolfing.  Hooray!  But then Anna comes back to see me, and she gets $10 off her session.  If she referred 20 people to come see me, this wouldn’t be a big deal.  But I don’t know how many people she referred to me.  All I know is that one came in.  Maybe Gina is the only person Anna’s told about me.  In which case, it would be very easy for Anna to deduce, from her reduced price session, that Gina has come in for a session with me.

This is where it gets tricky.  All of a sudden, client confidentiality is out the window.  I haven’t expressly told Anna, or anyone else, that Gina has come in for a session, but Anna knows, regardless.  And next time Anna and Gina are hanging out, Anna might casually mention to Gina, “So you went and got Rolfed by Theresa, huh?”  Now Gina may not know that Anna deduced this simply from getting $10 off her session.  She might instead assume that Anna and I were out at a bar and I started talking about the session I had with Gina.  She may also assume that in this conversation I let it slip that Gina’s been dealing with incontinence.  All of a sudden Gina is mortified, and will never trust me again.

Not okay.  Big fat not okay.  Capital ‘N,’ capital ‘O,’ Not Okay.

And so, even though I never expressly told anyone that Gina came to see me, nor any details of her session with me, Gina feels her trust has been betrayed.  And I never, ever, ever want you or any client to feel that way.  I am very careful to keep the identities of my clients private and the details of their sessions private.  Yes, there are HIPPA laws around this, and I respect those laws, but there’s more to it than what the laws dictate.  I want your sessions to feel safe.  I want them to be a place where you can relax and lay it all down, whatever it is that you’ve been carrying.  And I don’t want you to worry that it’s going to get back to your friends if they come in and see me as well, or if I see them while I’m walking around Wash Park.  Which is why I will guard your privacy with the utmost care, and also why I don’t and won’t have a referral rewards program.

Also, I want you to send people my way because you think they would benefit from a session with me, not because you’re trying to get cheap sessions for yourself.  That’s just a personal pride thing.  And lastly, referral reward programs feel a little like pyramid schemes to me and pyramid schemes feel skeazy.  I don’t like skeazy, even if it’s a cool word.

But I love referrals.  Really.  Like a whole bunch.  Thank you so, so much for each and every person you send my way.  It really is an honor that you trust me with the people you care about.  Thank you.

So, a few months ago, I wrote about how common and normal and not-at-all-a-problem it is for people to fall asleep during sessions with me.  And that’s still true.  But what about if you don’t fall asleep when you get Rolfed?  What about the times when the healing trance isn’t forcing your eyes to close and your breathing to slow?  Should you just think about your grocery list and that email you still have to send and what time yoga class starts tomorrow?  Well, obviously, you can think about whatever you’d like during a session.  But if I had my druthers, you would leave all those thoughts outside the office, to be picked up again on your way out, if you so choose.  And instead of thinking about what happened before your session, or what will happen after your session, maybe you could choose to focus on what is happening, right now, during your session.

I like to think of it as meeting me from the inside.  Wherever I’m working, bring your awareness there.  For some people, that means bringing your breath to that place.  Trying to breathe air and space into the tissues I’m working on.  For others, imagining light coming into those muscles or tendons is a better image.  I know some of my clients like to picture everything getting super juicy and extra-hydrated, like the tissues are water balloons, slowly being filled up.  For me, I literally imagine a piece of my brain breaking off (don’t worry, it doesn’t hurt) and traveling down to my leg or my abdomen or wherever to bring its wisdom to that area.  I’m sure there are a gazillion different ways to meet me from the inside, but whatever image works best for you, go with that one.

The thing is Sassypants, you and me, we work better as a team.  There’s only so much I can do on my own.  And while I don’t mind if you think about your grocery list, your session will be more effective if you’re working toward the same goals I am during your sessions.  If I’m pressing on your quads, asking for length, and you’re also asking on the inside for your quads to lengthen, chances are, your quads are going to lengthen; and it’s not going to take as long, or hurt as much, as it would have if I’d done it all myself.  So if for no other reason than to avoid pain, next time you’re in, try to meet me from the inside.  See how it goes!

You know what it’s like to receive a Rolfing/SourcePoint session from me, so I won’t go into it.  (And if you don’t know yet, I don’t know what you’re waiting for!  Get your butt into my office!)  Especially since everyone’s internal experience is so different and there’s not always a good way to describe it.  But what I will go into is what it feels like from my end.  What I experience while giving a session.  I’m in the process of trading a couple sessions with a fellow Rolfer and SoucePoint therapist and while I was working on him yesterday morning we got to talking about how each of us experiences healing from the practitioner’s point of view.  So let me lay it out for you, in case you were curious.   Disclaimer:  this is what it feels like for most of the sessions I do.  When working within the confines of the 10-series, it’s a little different, but not much.

I don’t heal anyone.   I can’t heal anyone.  Hate to break it to you.  The way I think about it is this:  your healing process is between you and your “gods.”  That may be God, or the trees, or your higher self, or your refrigerator, for all I care.  Regardless, it’s not me.  So, at the beginning of every session, I have a conversation that goes a little something like this:
Me:  “Hey, healing powers for this person!  Yeah, you!  So look, I’m here, in this room, with this person.  Is there anything I can help with?  You know how to heal, while I don’t.  And I have hands, while you don’t.  Let’s work together, yeah?  I’ll do my best to get my ego out of the way and listen really carefully to whatever directions you give if you’ll promise to do what you can on your end to heal whatever’s ready for healing in this person.  Deal?”
It/Them:  “Okay.  Deal.”

And so we begin.  Yes, it’s hokey.  No, I don’t care.  That’s really how it goes.  Well, maybe with more humility and respect and less yelling on my part.  And a ‘please’ or two.  But pretty close.  Then, I rely on SourcePoint scans to tell me where to begin and where to go next.  When I was in SoucePoint classes, scanning was described with colors.  White, then gray, then black.  Work where the biggest black spot is.  For me, it shows up kinesthetically; I feel a change in density.  Air, then water, then honey.  I work in the sweet spot.

I’m always asking more questions, though.  Sure, the scan said to work on your knee.  But do you have any idea how complicated a knee is?  Four different bones, all with their own rotations and intersections with each other.  There are 8 muscles that pull on the head of the fibula alone, and that’s one of the small bones!  ACLs and MCLs and patellar tendons, along with nerves and blood vessels galore.  So, once again, I ask those healing powers that be, “what now?”  And almost instantly, I get a response.  I don’t hear voices.  And it’s not exactly a vision either, although sometimes a picture of a specific piece of anatomy will pop into my head.  It’s more like there are magnets on my hands and iron on the body part and while my hands are being pulled in a certain direction, I just know how deep I’ll need to go to address this issue.  My friend Kate used to say she got information from her toes.  I’ll go with that.  My toes told me this was more emotional than physical.  My toes told me to pull up a chair ’cause it was going to take a while.  My toes told me to ask about your relationship with your grandmother.  So I listened.  I’ve got some pretty smart toes.  Or you’ve got some pretty smart healing powers on your side.  One of the two, for sure.

I often think of myself as a pipe, or a hose.  All I’m doing is connecting what’s above me, bigger than me, smarter than me, better at healing than me to you.  And my biggest job is to make sure I’m the cleanest, clearest tube I can be, so you get the transmission as close to the original as possible.  Of course, there’s also a huge element of personal responsibility.  If I sever a nerve in your face and you end up unable to smile for the rest of your life, neither you nor a judge will care one bit about how clean a hose I was at the time.  I need to know my shit and to stay on my game, so I do.  That’s my end of the deal.  Clean hose; know my shit.  Pretty easy compared to “heal this person.”  I lucked out in this deal, and I know it.  I’m so grateful for those healing powers that be.  Without them, I’d just be poking around, moving fascia.  Which can feel nice and all, but it’s not exactly healing.

Sometimes, when I ask “what now” I get really strange answers.  Burp out this stagnant energy that’s stuck here.  Sit back and do nothing for a minute while that last bit integrates.  Shake their right leg.  It’s gotten to the point where it’s no longer strange to me, but you can believe it was weird to get those messages when I was straight out of Rolfing school.  Burp?  Really?  We did NOT learn about that in Rolfing school.  Gross.  But sometimes I sneeze or cough or kinda growl instead.  What’s weird anymore?  Sometimes I have to shake my hands and arms to discharge the energy that’s released.  Sometimes I need to sit back for a minute ’cause I feel sick myself.  Thank you, so much, for putting up with me.  Sometimes the answer is “just sit and listen.”  That’s hard for me, and my impatience, but I try.  Sometimes the answer is “scan again” or “go deeper” or “get at this from the other side.”  I do my best to listen.

I keep asking “what now?” until I get the answer, “end the session.”  Then I seal it all up, in the way that I do, with a sacral cradle and setting the diamond points.  You get up and if you’re feeling good, we call it a day.  Well, at least you do.  I then get ready for the next session of burping, shaking, and being the best hose I can be.

P.S.  and then some.

Demo Day is next Wednesday!
If you know anyone who wants to try Rolfing and SourcePoint but is afraid to commit to a whole session, this is their chance.  30 minute trial sessions for $10 on Wednesday, March 14th at 662 Grant Street.  Have them give me a call at 303-261-2568 or shoot me an email at t.zordan@gmail.com to schedule.  New clients only, please.

Yoga Instructor Appreciation Week is over tomorrow.
And I’m so sad!  It’s been an absolute blast getting to know and working with all these Denver yogis.  Thanks for your help getting the word out!

I’m visiting my brother in France!
I’ll be out of town March 27th through April 11th, so please keep that in mind if you’re planning to schedule something soon.

Hey Sassy Pants, happy Tuesday!  Yoga Instructor Appreciation Week starts on Thursday and I’m totally pumped!  It’s filling up quickly (only 8 spots left out of 30 available openings!) and I’m so grateful to you for all your help in spreading the word to the yoga teachers in your life.  I couldn’t have done it without you!

Now, let’s get down to it.  This issue seems to keep coming up lately, so I thought I’d address it here, out in the open.  What happens after a Rolfing session?  What should you expect?  I know we talked a little bit about this after your first session.  You may have gotten an email with lots of details, depending on when you started working with me.  But let’s just go over it all again, ‘cause some weird shit can happen after you get Rolfed, I’m not gonna lie.

First, let’s cover the basics.
-You might be very thirsty.  We are trying to make your tissues extra juicy, afterall.  I know it’s hard to believe, but you should drink some water if this happens.  Weird, right?
-You might crave protein.  Fascia is a protein matrix and as we move it around, you might need some extra oomph to fill in the gaps.  If this happens, you should eat some steak or beans.  This stuff is so complicated, I know.
-You might want to sleep for 12 hours straight.  You should follow this impulse.  I’m not sure why this happens, but I have two theories.  One, your nervous system is finally coming out of its perpetual ‘fight or flight’ state and would now like to take some time off.  Two, your body would like to integrate some pretty major changes and would like your logical brain out of the way because it keeps interrupting with things like, “That doesn’t make any sense!  Your head can’t feel different; she only worked on your feet!”  So your body says to your brain, “sssshhhhh…why don’t you take a nap…a really long nap?”  Either way, if you’re tired; sleep.
-You might be sore, like you would be after a good, hard workout.  Arnica, an epsom salt bath, lots of water, and rest are all good ideas.
-You might notice your balance and perception have changed.  You might be standing differently on your feet or holding your head in a different place.  Hooray!  Just be careful as you begin to do things like operate a car or workout.  You might want to lay off the gym for 24-48 hours after your session, just to be safe.
-That thing that always hurts?  It doesn’t hurt anymore.  I think I’m legally bound to say that the relief of symptoms is NOT one of the goals of Rolfing.  But let’s be honest, I’m not going to complain if your pain goes away, and neither are you.

Let’s get a little weirder, shall we?  These things are a little less common, but by no means unique.
-You might feel a little dizziness or light-headedness.  Please tell me about this before you leave the room.  We can work on that.  I don’t want you falling down the stairs.
-You might have small, sharp pains in different places in your body.  This is what happens when sheets of fascia shear away from each other because your body is changing its posture.  This is a good thing, as fascia shouldn’t be glued together, it should glide.  When this happens, it feels a little like a bandaid’s being ripped off, on the inside.  It shouldn’t last more than a second or two and should fade over the next 48 hours.
-You might feel like you’re gliding, instead of walking.  That’s awesome.  Work it.
-You might feel taller, or more expansive, like you’re taking up all the space in your body.  Words don’t do justice to this feeling, but it’s amazing, so if you’ve got it, live it up.
-You may feel a bit drunk or stoned.  Yes, that’s normal.  Again, be careful if you’re going to drive.  Or send texts to your exes.
-You may feel stronger or easier, if that makes any sense.  I have often finished getting a session and thought, I could walk all day!  I feel invincible!  I hope you sometimes experience that, too.
-You might experience an emotional roller coaster.  Usually, there are issues in the tissues.  And when we go stirring up the tissues, we stir up the issues.  Waves of whatever you don’t need anymore can hit you on their way out.  If you need to cry, then by all means, cry.  Pop in The Color Purple if you need a little help getting started.
-My mom says she feels all rolled out, like with a rolling pin.  Or spread out, like pancake batter.  Maybe you’ll feel this, too.  Maybe my mom’s just got food on the brain.
-You might be more flexible.  That yoga pose you always struggle with is suddenly a breeze.  You can touch your toes for the first time in years.  We’re trying to increase the length in your body, so this just means we’ve done a good job during your session.  Yay!

On to the extra odd.  Yes, indeedy, this Rolfing business is a strange one.
-You may notice that your dreams shift in quality as you do a series of Rolfing sessions.  Ida Rolf, when pressed, once said that Rolfing was really shamanism, but what did she know?  You may have more of a “journey-like” quality to your dreams for a period of time.  Keeping a dream journal could be an interesting experience, if you’re up for it.
-If you’ve had a particularly intense session, you may experience some out-of-body time, as disassociation can be a way to take a time-out from what’s happening.  Again, tell me about this before you leave, please.  This doesn’t make for safe operation of heavy machinery.

That’s all I can think of right now, but I’m sure I’ve missed a few.  Have you experienced some Rolfing aftermath that should be on the list?  Could you please remind me?  Or, do you have a crazy story about experiencing any of the above?  I’d love to hear about it!  Feel free to shoot me an email, or post it right here by leaving a comment.

And if you experience anything out of the ordinary that’s NOT on this list, please, please, please tell me about it.  I do free touch-up sessions if something’s just not integrating quite right.  As usual, thanks for reading.  Until next time, much love!

Okay, I know you know what a session is like You’ve had one, or several.  But do you ever have trouble explaining what it’s like to get Rolfed?  How you feel better, but it’s tough to put your finger on why?  Sure, the work hurts sometimes, but it also feels so good.  You know your friends are looking at you like you’re nuts.  What do you mean you feel taller?  What do you mean you feel more graceful?  You feel bigger?  Is that a good thing?  You feel more grounded?  It’s easier to breathe?  Your feet are contacting the ground more?  Huh?

This is your opportunity to share your experience with the skeptics.  Your mom doesn’t get it.  Your boyfriend just rolls his eyes.  Your coworker thinks you’ve been smoking something.  Let them all experience this stuff themselves and then they can try and explain it.  And you can sit there with that satisfied smirk on your face and say, “I told you so!”  And really, isn’t that what we all want out of life?

Demo Day returns this Saturday, October 15th.  30 minute sessions.  $10.  It doesn’t get better than that.  It’s the perfect way to try Rolfing, to try SourcePoint, and to try me to see if it’s something you like, without the commitment of a full session.  So spread the word and let the skeptics try it for themselves.  When they’re ready to give it a whirl, have them give me a call at 303-261-2568 or email me at t.zordan@gmail.com to set up their own personal demo!