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Well, it’s clearly summertime.  Between seeing your lovely face at my office, backpacking, weddings, volleyball tournaments, long runs, visits from out-of-towners, and just the general fun of summer, I’ve barely had time to brush my teeth.  Just kidding.  I love brushing my teeth.  But seriously, what a whirlwind.  There’s been so much going on and so much I’ve wanted to write about, so here we go.

First, a very belated, but very heartfelt THANK YOU to everyone who participated in Pay What You Want Week back in April.  As usual, it was an absolute blast.  I can’t think of a better way to celebrate my birthday.  I got to meet so many new people, and see so many others I hadn’t seen in a while.  I have The Best clients.  Thank you for that.

Next, I’m sad to announce that I’ll be moving to a new office location soon.  The building I’m currently in has been sold, so I’ll be out by the end of September.  I’m looking at several options nearby and I’ll keep you posted with changes as I know more.  If anyone has a great space they know about, be sure to get me the deets!

For any of you who are interested in the energy work I include in my sessions, there’s a chance for you to learn to do it yourself September 26-28.  My friend (and my Rolfer) Dave Sheldon is hosting a workshop in Boulder, led by the creator of SourcePoint Therapy himself, Bob Shrei.  It’s open to anyone (not just bodyworkers or medical professionals), so if you’re interested, don’t hesitate!  It costs $500 and you can learn more by contacting Dave directly at 303-519-2412 or email: dave@davesheldon.com.

Lastly, there’s a weekend workshop in November at the Shambhala Mountain Center with Will Johnson, a Rolfer and meditation teacher from Vancouver.  I was on Will’s team last year when he did an 8-day retreat in Crestone and this is a mini-version of that.  If you’d like to do a meditation retreat where your body feels better at the end than the beginning, this is the retreat for you.  More information can be found here.

So those are the highlights.  Like I said, I’ll keep you posted with moving news as things get settled.  Until then, enjoy all the fresh produce of the season!

So, a few months ago, I wrote about how common and normal and not-at-all-a-problem it is for people to fall asleep during sessions with me.  And that’s still true.  But what about if you don’t fall asleep when you get Rolfed?  What about the times when the healing trance isn’t forcing your eyes to close and your breathing to slow?  Should you just think about your grocery list and that email you still have to send and what time yoga class starts tomorrow?  Well, obviously, you can think about whatever you’d like during a session.  But if I had my druthers, you would leave all those thoughts outside the office, to be picked up again on your way out, if you so choose.  And instead of thinking about what happened before your session, or what will happen after your session, maybe you could choose to focus on what is happening, right now, during your session.

I like to think of it as meeting me from the inside.  Wherever I’m working, bring your awareness there.  For some people, that means bringing your breath to that place.  Trying to breathe air and space into the tissues I’m working on.  For others, imagining light coming into those muscles or tendons is a better image.  I know some of my clients like to picture everything getting super juicy and extra-hydrated, like the tissues are water balloons, slowly being filled up.  For me, I literally imagine a piece of my brain breaking off (don’t worry, it doesn’t hurt) and traveling down to my leg or my abdomen or wherever to bring its wisdom to that area.  I’m sure there are a gazillion different ways to meet me from the inside, but whatever image works best for you, go with that one.

The thing is Sassypants, you and me, we work better as a team.  There’s only so much I can do on my own.  And while I don’t mind if you think about your grocery list, your session will be more effective if you’re working toward the same goals I am during your sessions.  If I’m pressing on your quads, asking for length, and you’re also asking on the inside for your quads to lengthen, chances are, your quads are going to lengthen; and it’s not going to take as long, or hurt as much, as it would have if I’d done it all myself.  So if for no other reason than to avoid pain, next time you’re in, try to meet me from the inside.  See how it goes!

Last night I sat down to write a newsletter about scarcity versus abundance.  Three paragraphs in, I decided to try a different approach.  Three paragraphs after that, I decided to try a different topic.  After a while, I just stopped.  As I climbed into bed, mad at myself for not having finished writing today’s newsletter, I realized the problem:  something else was on my mind.  Something else has been on my mind for about a week now, to be honest.

I got a call last week from one of my instructors at the Rolf Institute.  Apparently there’s been some discussion on the Rolf Forum about this video of mine, called “What Should I Expect From Rolfing?”  I made this video simply because I had about 20 people in a row come in for their first session and say to me at the end, “Well, that wasn’t what I was expecting.”  I thought that people should have a better understanding of what they were getting into before they came for a session.  Also, I figured it would help weed out the people who weren’t a good fit for my style of working.  I think it’s been doing its job because nowadays, pretty much every new client I get, I absolutely love, right off the bat.  There have been a lot of perfect fits, at least from my point of view, which is super awesome.  Less people wasting their money on the wrong Rolfer.  Less people spending an hour and a half thinking, “This isn’t what I was expecting!”  More people thinking, “Ah, this is just what I wanted!”  Seems like a good thing all around.

And yet, there’s this argument going on.  Let me explain.  The Rolf Forum was created back when the interweb was new, as a way to connect the (relatively small) Rolfer community.  To date there are just barely 1800 Certified Rolfers™ in the whole world.  Put a few hundred in Japan, a bunch in Europe and Canada, some in Brazil and Bali and Australia, and it can start to feel kinda lonely being a Rolfer.  I know it’s hard to believe, here in Colorado, where the Rolf Institute is located and there’s a Rolfer on every corner.  But there are zero Rolfers in Mississippi.  And two in Indiana (and they’re both named Dan; weird).  So the internet brought all these isolated Rolfers together to talk about questions they’d had or struggles with their practices or new research being done they wanted to share.  I’ll be honest:  I’ve never been on the Rolf Forum.  Don’t even know where to find it.  Not because I don’t want to connect with other Rolfers, but because my network of Rolfers is more personal and specific.  I feel very comfortable calling or emailing my instructors and mentors if I have a question or concern.  My classmates make the perfect network when I have a practice building question, or just want to geek out about Rolfing for a bit.  I call Sasha and Laura up, or better yet, we get together for beers when we’re in the same state.  I trade sessions with a few different Rolfers, and we ask all the questions we have, during those sessions.  I waste enough time on Facebook, thank you very much, and I don’t feel the need for another place to spend time online.  So it’s not out of disrespect for the Forum that I’ve never been on it; I just don’t seem to need it in my life.

But my instructor called me because my little video had started an argument on the Forum.  Apparently there are some Rolfers who don’t think what I’m doing is Rolfing.  Ida Rolf never talked about energy work, on video, at least.  There are plenty of quotes from her about energy fields and energy work in books, but she was trying to be seen as credible as she created this new form of bodywork in the 60′s and energy work didn’t go over so great with the medical community at the time.  Damn hippies.  Dr. Rolf put a great deal of energy into explaining things in structural terms and making sure her students were well educated in anatomy and physiology.  She wasn’t going to have people talking about pushing on the thingy until it felt squishy.  So, the argument goes, if Ida didn’t want to talk about energy work in her videos, why should I?  And there’s also the question of brand identity.  If someone goes to see a Rolfer in Minnesota, then moves to Denver and wants a Rolfer here, so comes to see me, they’re not going to get the same thing they got in Minnesota.

Well, duh, is what I say to that.  If you go see one doctor, then go see another, you’re not going to get the same thing.  That’s why it’s called a second opinion.  If they were all exactly the same, you wouldn’t bother to get a second opinion.  But just because different doctors do things differently, it doesn’t mean one’s a doctor and one’s not.  And when it comes to me talking about things that Ida wouldn’t…um, I’m not Ida.  Obviously.  I couldn’t be a little old lady from New York if I tried.  I don’t even like New York.  And I’m 5’8″, not 5’2″.  And Zordan’s a funny name, but not in the same way Rolf is.

So, it seems obvious to me, that this is a non-issue.  Yes, I’m a Rolfer.  Yes, I do energy work.  No, I don’t mind talking about it.  But now I want to know what you think.  Is what I do Rolfing?  You’ve had a session from me.  You’ve heard what other people say about Rolfing, and you’ve done your research on Rolfing in general.  Many of you have had Rolfing sessions from other Rolfers.  How do the sessions compare?  Would you say I don’t belong with other Rolfers?  When you get a chance,  post a comment on the blog here.  I’d really love to hear what you think.  And I’ll try to get to scarcity versus abundance soon.  I promise.

Oh, and Demo Day is Saturday.  If you haven’t had a session from me, and you want to try it for yourself, to see if I’m really a Rolfer or not, this is the perfect opportunity.  A 30 minute session for just $10.  There are only 4 spots left, so if you want one, get on it.

While I was in Chicago last week, I got a good question from one of my clients that I thought I’d share:  What happens when a client comes in with no pain?  Short answer:  I get really excited.

Now, for the long answer…

See, most of the people I see in my office are there looking to “fix” something, as you know because you watched last week’s interview, right?.  Your shoulder; your back; your left pinky toe; they all hurt and you want them not to hurt.  Which is great, and I get it.  Pain sucks; you want it to go away.  I want that, too.  And until we get rid of the pain, you’re not going to be able to focus on much else.

But my “real” goal as a Rolfer and as a SourcePoint Therapist is to allow health to manifest.  I want your true self to come forth and shine in its most vibrant form.  Don’t you want that, too?!?  Getting rid of the pain may be the first step in the process, but once that’s accomplished, we can focus on encouraging health and vibrancy.

So when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.  It’s rare, you see, for someone to walk in my door just because they’re curious.  Just because they want to see what this Rolfing thing is all about.  Just because they heard that Rolfing could make you more you.  But when it happens, I love it.  Then, we get down to business.  This particular client, who has no pain, is the perfect candidate for the traditional 10-series because it’s such a thorough full-body tune up.  But 10 sessions is a big commitment and until you’re absolutely ready, it’s not the sort of thing you want to rush into.  So generally, we start the same way I’d start any other session, by setting the 4 diamond points and doing a scan.  Generally when people come in with no physical pain, we get to explore other layers of their being, such as the emotional, traumatic, or karmic blockages that may be preventing health from manifesting.  Often, this is tied up in the physical, but they’re not aware of the holding patterns, so we work on bringing awareness and releasing restrictions.

Working with clients who have no pain can throw me a little off kilter, seeing as I’m so used to working with a goal in mind.  But it also leaves a lot of room for creativity and just trusting the energy to lead me to the right place.  With no goal of “fixing the back pain,” I don’t worry that my own intentions or projections are skewing my intuition or the sourcepoint scans I’m doing.  Everything’s on the table, so to speak.  Nothing is too “off base” to be considered.  So, in the end, when a client comes in with no pain, I get excited.

 

Thanks for your help with Demo Day!
Next month there won’t be a Demo Day, but they’ll start back up on June 16th.

Want to learn how to do SourcePoint yourself?
One of the founders of SourcePoint Therapy is coming to Boulder May 18th-20th to teach an introductory class for anyone who wants to take it.  You don’t have to be a bodyworker or healthcare practitioner.  This form of energy work is easy to learn and very powerful for maintaining your own health as well as the health of your family members.  The cost is $375.  For more information, please contact Dave Sheldon at 303-519-2412.

Meditation/Bodywork Retreat
The Posture of Meditation:  Breathing Through the Whole Body.  October 26-November 4th, in Crestone, Colorado with Will Johnson.  Combining meditation techniques with Rolfing.  Participants will receive a Rolfing session every other day for a total of 5 sessions, while spending several hours each day in meditation.  If interested, please let me know.

Once upon a time I wrote an article about plantar fasciitisWhile I found it absolutely brilliant at the time, I have since realized it’s lacking in the practical application department.  Sure, you can get a great basic understanding of what plantar fasciitis is and why you might suffer from it.   And those things are very helpful and all well and good and a wonderful place to start.  In fact, if you have no idea what I’m talking about, go here and read the article now, before you continue on with this little ditty.  But then what?  Yeah, it hurts.  No, I can’t run anymore.  Theresa, are you ever going to tell me what to do about it?

The thing is, since any number of things can cause plantar fasciitis, it’s awfully difficult to give generic advice about.  But I’m going to try.  ‘Cause I’m an overachiever.  So, first things first, we need to figure out where the root or roots of your particular plantar fasciitis may be hiding out.  Let’s start with the most obvious.  Have you injured your foot lately?  Stepped on a big pokey rock while barefoot?  Gone a bit overboard with the salsa dancing?  If so, it’s probably best to use the RICE method for a while.  Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation; just like you would for a sprained ankle.  And we all know that with ice we’re doing 20 minutes on, then 20 minutes off, right?  After 20 minutes of icing something, you start to increase the inflammation, so don’t go pushing this, trying to be an overachiever, too.  After a week or so of the chowing down on your RICE, you can start pushing around in there to see if you’re ready for some soft tissue work.  If it’s still super sore to the touch, keep RICEing ’til it doesn’t.  If you can get a moderately deep foot massage without pain, you’re ready for deep work, if you need it.  If your pain’s gone completely, congrats! you just healed your own plantar fasciitis!  Otherwise, use a tennis ball, standing on it and rolling slowly, slowly over the owie spots to get them to loosen up.  You don’t want to bring back that inflammation, so be careful.

Now, let’s say you have not injured your foot, but you still have plantar fasciits.  This is where it gets tricky.  Naturally, we’re going to be looking along your back line for a super tight spot that could be causing your foot pain.  Starting with your heel and using your fingers (or someone else’s) or a tennis ball dig into your soft tissue (not the bones) slowly working your way up your calf.  Be careful as you get to the knee ’cause there’s a whole bunch of juicy, yet delicate stuff right there in the open at the back of the knee.  In fact, just don’t press into the back of the knee.  It’s not worth the risks.  Then head up your hamstrings, which could take a while as those are some meaty suckers.  Speaking of juicy meat, head north through your glutes, going slow and savory-like.  Next up, low back, heading up to mid, then upper back.  Again, you should be able to manage all this while lying on a tennis ball on the floor, but having a friend do the work for you is extra nice.  If you still haven’t found your “ouchy!” spot, head up (gently!) to the neck, then over the head, all the way to your eyebrows.  If you haven’t found any especially tight spots, you’ve got a catch-22 to deal with.  On the one hand, you’re the only person in the whole country who doesn’t have a single tight spot along their back line.  You should get a prize!  On the other, you still have no idea where your plantar fasciitis is coming from and you’re probably going to require some help from a professional.  Can’t win ‘em all, I suppose.

If, instead, you have found a tight spot, or six, you now know where to focus your efforts.   Loosen up that fascia, nice and slow and easy-like, using that same tennis ball if your hands get tired or you can’t quite reach.  Little bits at a time; like 5 or 10 minutes a day.  Max.  Again, I’m the only overachiever allowed here.  I don’t want you doing more damage than good.  Don’t go pretending you’re a Rolfer.  Besides, when Rolfers work on themselves they tend to get all messed up ’cause they don’t respect their own boundaries and stop when they should.  Better not to go there.  Trust me.

After a week or so working on your trouble areas, you should start to notice a shift in your plantar fasciitis pain.  If not, reevaluate.  Retest your back line and see if maybe your tight spots have moved.  If you feel like you need the help of a professional, give me a call.  You may also have some energetic blockages that need to be cleared and we’ll go into that next.  But if you’re noticing a difference in the right direction, keep up the good work!  Remember not to overdo it, but consistency can go a long way here.

Energetic gunk and plantar fascia.  I don’t have a logical explanation for this, but I do have a story.  My mom called me and told me she had plantar fasciitis and she needed me to fix it.  Lucky for her, I was flying into Chicago the next week and I could take a look.  We did a session.  All went well, but I couldn’t find any outstanding tightness in her back line that pointed to causing this foot pain.  So after the session had a day to settle out I asked how her foot was feeling and she said the pain was still there.  I was heading back to Denver that evening and didn’t have time for another session, nor did I think that would help.  Instead, I asked her to do some energy work on her heel, whenever she could.  I told her to pretend to draw the stuck energy out of the bottom of her heel, as if she were pulling yarn out of a ball.  Just an inch or two at a time, over and over again.  Maybe only 3 minutes at a time, but several times a day.  I told her to do it whenever she sat down.  So she did.  And 2 weeks later, she said it was completely gone.  That was in November and she hasn’t had any problems with it since.  So, hey, why not give it a try?  It’s free, it’s easy, and at least for one person, it worked.

Yes!  I did it!  Practical tips for dealing with plantar fasciitis!  Done.  Bam.  Oh, and one more.  Call your favorite local Rolfer, if you don’t seem to be making much progress on your own.  She might be able to help you out.

You know what it’s like to receive a Rolfing/SourcePoint session from me, so I won’t go into it.  (And if you don’t know yet, I don’t know what you’re waiting for!  Get your butt into my office!)  Especially since everyone’s internal experience is so different and there’s not always a good way to describe it.  But what I will go into is what it feels like from my end.  What I experience while giving a session.  I’m in the process of trading a couple sessions with a fellow Rolfer and SoucePoint therapist and while I was working on him yesterday morning we got to talking about how each of us experiences healing from the practitioner’s point of view.  So let me lay it out for you, in case you were curious.   Disclaimer:  this is what it feels like for most of the sessions I do.  When working within the confines of the 10-series, it’s a little different, but not much.

I don’t heal anyone.   I can’t heal anyone.  Hate to break it to you.  The way I think about it is this:  your healing process is between you and your “gods.”  That may be God, or the trees, or your higher self, or your refrigerator, for all I care.  Regardless, it’s not me.  So, at the beginning of every session, I have a conversation that goes a little something like this:
Me:  “Hey, healing powers for this person!  Yeah, you!  So look, I’m here, in this room, with this person.  Is there anything I can help with?  You know how to heal, while I don’t.  And I have hands, while you don’t.  Let’s work together, yeah?  I’ll do my best to get my ego out of the way and listen really carefully to whatever directions you give if you’ll promise to do what you can on your end to heal whatever’s ready for healing in this person.  Deal?”
It/Them:  “Okay.  Deal.”

And so we begin.  Yes, it’s hokey.  No, I don’t care.  That’s really how it goes.  Well, maybe with more humility and respect and less yelling on my part.  And a ‘please’ or two.  But pretty close.  Then, I rely on SourcePoint scans to tell me where to begin and where to go next.  When I was in SoucePoint classes, scanning was described with colors.  White, then gray, then black.  Work where the biggest black spot is.  For me, it shows up kinesthetically; I feel a change in density.  Air, then water, then honey.  I work in the sweet spot.

I’m always asking more questions, though.  Sure, the scan said to work on your knee.  But do you have any idea how complicated a knee is?  Four different bones, all with their own rotations and intersections with each other.  There are 8 muscles that pull on the head of the fibula alone, and that’s one of the small bones!  ACLs and MCLs and patellar tendons, along with nerves and blood vessels galore.  So, once again, I ask those healing powers that be, “what now?”  And almost instantly, I get a response.  I don’t hear voices.  And it’s not exactly a vision either, although sometimes a picture of a specific piece of anatomy will pop into my head.  It’s more like there are magnets on my hands and iron on the body part and while my hands are being pulled in a certain direction, I just know how deep I’ll need to go to address this issue.  My friend Kate used to say she got information from her toes.  I’ll go with that.  My toes told me this was more emotional than physical.  My toes told me to pull up a chair ’cause it was going to take a while.  My toes told me to ask about your relationship with your grandmother.  So I listened.  I’ve got some pretty smart toes.  Or you’ve got some pretty smart healing powers on your side.  One of the two, for sure.

I often think of myself as a pipe, or a hose.  All I’m doing is connecting what’s above me, bigger than me, smarter than me, better at healing than me to you.  And my biggest job is to make sure I’m the cleanest, clearest tube I can be, so you get the transmission as close to the original as possible.  Of course, there’s also a huge element of personal responsibility.  If I sever a nerve in your face and you end up unable to smile for the rest of your life, neither you nor a judge will care one bit about how clean a hose I was at the time.  I need to know my shit and to stay on my game, so I do.  That’s my end of the deal.  Clean hose; know my shit.  Pretty easy compared to “heal this person.”  I lucked out in this deal, and I know it.  I’m so grateful for those healing powers that be.  Without them, I’d just be poking around, moving fascia.  Which can feel nice and all, but it’s not exactly healing.

Sometimes, when I ask “what now” I get really strange answers.  Burp out this stagnant energy that’s stuck here.  Sit back and do nothing for a minute while that last bit integrates.  Shake their right leg.  It’s gotten to the point where it’s no longer strange to me, but you can believe it was weird to get those messages when I was straight out of Rolfing school.  Burp?  Really?  We did NOT learn about that in Rolfing school.  Gross.  But sometimes I sneeze or cough or kinda growl instead.  What’s weird anymore?  Sometimes I have to shake my hands and arms to discharge the energy that’s released.  Sometimes I need to sit back for a minute ’cause I feel sick myself.  Thank you, so much, for putting up with me.  Sometimes the answer is “just sit and listen.”  That’s hard for me, and my impatience, but I try.  Sometimes the answer is “scan again” or “go deeper” or “get at this from the other side.”  I do my best to listen.

I keep asking “what now?” until I get the answer, “end the session.”  Then I seal it all up, in the way that I do, with a sacral cradle and setting the diamond points.  You get up and if you’re feeling good, we call it a day.  Well, at least you do.  I then get ready for the next session of burping, shaking, and being the best hose I can be.

P.S.  and then some.

Demo Day is next Wednesday!
If you know anyone who wants to try Rolfing and SourcePoint but is afraid to commit to a whole session, this is their chance.  30 minute trial sessions for $10 on Wednesday, March 14th at 662 Grant Street.  Have them give me a call at 303-261-2568 or shoot me an email at t.zordan@gmail.com to schedule.  New clients only, please.

Yoga Instructor Appreciation Week is over tomorrow.
And I’m so sad!  It’s been an absolute blast getting to know and working with all these Denver yogis.  Thanks for your help getting the word out!

I’m visiting my brother in France!
I’ll be out of town March 27th through April 11th, so please keep that in mind if you’re planning to schedule something soon.

This subject has come up 4 different times, with 4 different people in the last week.  So I figured now was as good a time as any to drag it out into the light. The conversation goes something like this:  “I’m fine with the Rolfing.  I just don’t believe in the energy work.”  Or, more directly, “So, you’re a witch doctor.”  And my favorite, “Weird.  You went directly to where it hurts and I didn’t even tell you.”

And can I just begin with this:  I know it’s weird.  I think it’s weird, too.  It’s just that I happen to like weird stuff.  I was first exposed to SourcePoint Therapy by my hero, my mentor, my greatest instructor at the Rolf Institute, Ray McCall.  And watching him work was amazing, in that we, as students, never had any idea how he knew what he knew.  But when the client got off the table, the results were undeniable.  They looked lighter, freer, easier, and about a foot taller.  It was so weird, and so maddening, because we had no idea how to recreate it in our own clients.  My classmate, Laura, and I commonly remarked that we just knew he had a magic wand somewhere, maybe up his sleeve, or under the table or something, and if only we could get our hands on magic wands of our own, we could be amazing Rolfers, too.

The thing is, it wasn’t too long ago that I thought energy work was for whack jobs.  I used to roll my eyes and nod condescendingly when people talked about moving qi and seeing auras and whatnot.  So if you’re there now, I’m fine with that.  I get it.  I wanted something “real;” something I could touch with my hands.  But now, I can feel energy, and touch it with my hands.  I know it’s real, even if nobody else believes me.  Call it intuition combined with self-esteem.  Call it the placebo effect.  Call it crazy.  It doesn’t matter to me.  This is the way I work.  This is what makes sense for me.  If it bothers you, or offends your sensibilities, or you think I’m wasting your time waving my hands in the air, then you probably shouldn’t be my client.  I’d be happy to refer you to a Rolfer where there will be absolutely no energy work or magic wand waving involved.

But when I get a session that includes energy work, it’s a much more holistic session, than one without.  Yes, we’re working on my back pain and that weird thing my knee does, but we’re also working on the bad ju-ju that’s stuck in my knee contributing to why I keep injuring it.  Which is why I signed up for a SourcePoint class ten days after I graduated as a Rolfer and have been incorporating it in my work ever since.  I called Laura after that class ended and said, “I feel like I got my own magic wand!”  She knew what I was talking about.  Now, when I’m working, I trust the information I receive from the energetic field.  More often than not, it makes for happy, pain-free clients, and that’s what I’m after.  Without SourcePoint, I’d be doing the 10-series, and pretty much only the 10-series.  Despite my love of the 10-series, it’s not for everyone.  Besides, I think the world could use a little more magic, in every aspect of life, so why not have a little more magic in our healing?  So go ahead, call me a witch doctor.  I’ll take it as a compliment.

SourcePoint Goodness

This is only the tip of the weird ice berg

But we’re mixing it up this time.

This Demo Day is going to be 100% energetic.  SourcePoint Therapy without the Rolfing aspect.  Little or no hands-on work; all energy, all the time.  Oh, and this isn’t just for new clients; this applies to anyone and everyone who’s interested in trying out some energy work.  The other aspects of Demo Day will remain the same.  30 minute sessions, $10 each, in Denver at 662 Grant St. on the second floor.  Call me at 303-261-2568 or email me at t.zordan@gmail.com to set up your appointment.

This is a great opportunity to dive a little deeper into the stranger part of what I do.  Ask the woo-woo questions.  Get your chakras balanced.  Get a scan specifically focused on karmic blockages.  Receive a crescent moon hold and bring in the energy of many goddesses.  What?  I told you it was strange.  This is Demo Day gone granola.  And I know it’s not for everybody.  But if you’re curious, why not give it a try?

This is also perfect for people who aren’t comfortable being touched.  Most people who come to see me for Rolfing are familiar with and comfortable with body work.  But there are a lot of people out there who aren’t thrilled with the idea of a stranger touching them.  This Demo Day is perfect for those people to experience some body therapy without the uncomfortable somebody’s-touching-me thing.  Most people who have some fear around being touched are the very people who need it most.  And this can be a comfortable way to step into that scary place without all the fear.

So, if you’ve got a little hippie in you, come on in for Energetic Demo Day on Monday November 14th.  Next week I’ll be posting a menu of about 10 options for you to choose from for your energy work.  Get ready for the weird, pick the one that speaks to you, and give me a call!  Oh, and as usual, tell your friends!

1. Where are you located? Why? Because if you have to spend 90 minutes getting to your 90 minute appointments, you’re less likely to go. Just like a gym membership, Rolfing is more effective the more often you utilize it. While I know one person who took the bus 3 hours each way to his Rolfing appointments and went through the entire 10-series, most of us just aren’t that dedicated.

My A: My main office is at 662 Grant, on the second floor, in Denver, CO. I have a secondary office at 489 US. Hwy 287, inside the Baseline Chiropractic office in Lafayette, CO. I occasionally visit Chicago and when I do, I practice out of the Relaxation Station at 10655 S. Hale.

2. How much do you charge? Why? Because if you can’t afford it, there’s no reason asking any other questions. The average price range for Rolfing sessions varies widely by location, from $100 to $400. Again, Rolfing is more effective with more sessions, so plan for at least 3 visits. Rolfing is almost never covered by insurance.

My A: My fee is $120 per session. Children 10 and under are free. I don’t bill insurance companies, but am happy to provide treatment notes and receipts if this is an avenue you’d like to pursue.

3. What forms of payment do you take? Why? Because most Rolfers only accept cash and checks. You don’t want to show up with plastic and feel sheepish.

My A: I accept cash, checks, Visa, Mastercard, and Discover.

4. What is your style of working? Why? To know who’s a great or terrible fit for you and your body. You can learn a lot about a Rolfer by asking this question. -A “traditional” or “old school” Rolfer will tend to be very rough. Ida Rolf was not gentle, nor were the Rolfers who trained with her. This may be a good fit if you like super deep pressure, or are a masochist. -Someone who blends massage and Rolfing may used fascial release techniques in a traditional massage. This may be a good fit if you enjoy massage, but want a taste of Rolfing as well. -A movement practitioner is someone who’s completed an extra training to become movement certified. Movement work can be very powerful, but requires a lot of participation and involvement from the client. Not for those who are planning to sleep through their sessions. -Cranial-sacral work is very subtle, using very light pressure but with huge potential for change. Perfect for those afraid of “old school” Rolfing and awful for those who want an elbow in their quads.

My A: I use a broad spectrum of touch to get the maximum change with the minimum discomfort. While moments may be intense, most people find my work to be relaxing and enjoyable. I combine SourcePoint Therapy and Rolfing in a customized blend to fit your body and your needs. If you don’t want any energy work, or any hands-on work, I’m probably not the right fit for you as I have a hard time eliminating either completely. Oh, and you get to keep your clothes on during your session.

5. Do I need to do the 10-series? Why? Whether or not you want to receive the 10-series, you should know what your Rolfer has planned for you before you walk in the door.

My A: No; how many sessions you do is up to you. I do offer the traditional Rolfing 10­series if that’s the route you’d like to pursue, but it’s not expected. I’m happy to do targeted, customized sessions instead of following ‘the recipe.’

6. Where did you do your training? Why? Because Rolfers who trained in Brazil will have more of a movement emphasis in their work than people trained in the US or Germany. People who trained at the Guild for Structural Integration will be more traditional than people trained at the Rolf Institute®. Hellerworkers tend to integrate more talk therapy into their Structural Integration sessions. Neither Guild practitioners nor Hellerwork practitioners are considered “Rolfers” but are Structural Integrators.

My A: I trained at the Rolf Institute in Boulder, CO and have done all my continuing education there as well, except for one class in Santa Fe, NM.

7. How long have you been in practice? Why? This one’s a catch-22. Rolfers who have been in practice a long time obviously have more experience, which is a good thing. But there’s been a lot of research and new technique development in the 40 years that Rolfing’s been around. A Rolfer who hasn’t stayed on top of their continuing education may be working in an outdated way. Then again, a newer Rolfer may not have the experience needed to handle extremely complicated issues. And some people are just ‘naturals’ at Rolfing, whether they’re new or old. So it’s kind of a toss up, but it’s still good to know.

My A: I’m in my second year of practice.

Well, let me tell you, I work with people of all ages.  I love working with children.  To date, the youngest person I’ve worked with was three weeks old.  Birth is a pretty traumatic experience and usually there’s some residual holding patterns that a kid can get stuck with if they’re not addressed.  In older children, I’ve worked with general posture, back pain, ADD, sleep patterns, headaches and migraines, and self confidence issues.  It’s fun for me to work with kids for a lot of reasons, but one of the main ones is that their tissues respond so quickly.  They have patterns that have only been held for a few years, instead of 20 or 40, and those patterns are quick to unravel with a little input.

On the other end of the spectrum, my oldest client so far was 87.  I enjoy working with the elderly as well, but you have to understand that scoliosis in an 87-year-old is a very different issue than scoliosis in a 12-year-old.  Treatment for older people is generally going to take longer, both in session length and number.  And reversing an 87-year-old pattern completely is nearly impossible, although there’s a lot that can be done by way of pain management and damage control.

So now you know.  If you’re alive, I’ll work with you.  I’m not an ageist, after all.